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manumit

TPMS question

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I purchased my 2014 TC used and it had snow tires on it when I got it. Everything worked fine, no tire pressure notifications. I purchased a set of new tires and rims so I could swap between summer and winter tires. When I purchased them they put in 315mhz pressure sensors. I switched to the summer tires, but had to buy a trigger tool to get them to be recognized. When I put the snow tires back on they aren't recognized and I don't seem to be able to get them recognize, so I'm stuck with a persistent error on the dash and no monitoring. 

 

What kind of options do I have for what could be going wrong? Is there some kind of other trigger tool that I need to get the van to recognize the winter tires again? 

 

I don't feel like I understand how the TPMS technology works well enough to troubleshoot. Does anyone have any suggestions or input that might help me?

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Generally prices here in Canada are higher than USA. That said, I have no problem using old-fashioned hand tire gauge and simply ignoring the TPMS warning in dash.

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There is a process for resetting the TPMS when you change sensors.  It a bit too length to list here, but you can search for it on this forum or just google it.  You don't need to buy a different trigger.  The one you have should work fine, but if not, you can just let air out of the tires to "trigger" the TPMS module.

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Not sure if you're just wanting the TPMS re-set procedure?  This is the procedure I use on my 2018 TC...

 

TPMS sensor reset procedure:

1- Inflate all tires to spec.

2- Ignition switch to OFF then press and release the brake pedal.

3- Turn ignition switch from OFF to RUN 3 times, ending in the RUN position within 10 seconds.

4- Press and release the brake pedal.

5- Ignition switch back to OFF.

6- Ignition switch from OFF to RUN 3 times, ending in the RUN position. within 10 seconds.

7- The horn should sound letting you know the vehicle has entered into TPMS relearn mode.  Place the top of the TPMS triggering tool against the sidewall of the driver’s side front tire in the location of the valve stem. Press the button, wait until the horn sounds.

8- Once the horn sounds, move on to the passenger side front tire and repeat the process. Each tire should only take 30 seconds or less.

10) After the passenger side front tire has been learned, continue on to the passenger side rear tire and finishing with the driver’s side rear tire.

11) You may now turn the ignition to OFF. If the horn does not sound, the sensors were learned successfully. If the horn sounds twice, then the process must be repeated because there was a malfunction.

Edited by PWFX

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2 hours ago, davidparker said:

You don't need to buy a different trigger.  The one you have should work fine, but if not, you can just let air out of the tires to "trigger" the TPMS module.

 

 

 

Tire shop techs say that a magnet will work.  You don't even need the special tool.  

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The magnet only works on older sensors.

Are you sure you are in the learn mode?

The horn must sound and the display will let you know .

 

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Ah right, sorry. better info required. Yes, I definitely have put it in learn mode. It says it on the display when it is in learn mode. If I put it into learn mode and try to trigger the tires as directed it doesn't detect. I know the trigger tool works though because I had to do it with the new tires when I got them. It's just the original winter tires that won't detect or re-learn. 

 

Is there a way to tell if the right sensor is installed in a tire? 

Is it possible for the batteries in the sensors to die?

Edited by manumit

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First, go into learn mode. Then see if you can trigger the sensors by letting air out of the tire.  If that works, the sensors are fine.  

Edited by Fifty150

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TPMS sensor batteries generally last 5-10 years or about 100,000 miles.

 

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The learn more expects to read a low pressure trigger signal in a specific order. Starts at left front and rotates clockwise. You can erroneously tell the ECU a tire is in the wrong location by deflating the wrong tire. 

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If you have a tpms scanner it will trigger the sensor for the relearn and it will give you the sensor number, the pressure and the battery condition .

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At the risk of being "a pain in the b****",  I will repeat: What is wrong with USING a $3 to $5 Tire Gauge and couple of minutes EASY work ???

Yes, ALL batteries eventually wear out.

Edited by Gideon

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On 12/21/2019 at 7:40 PM, Gideon said:

simply ignoring the TPMS warning in dash

 

 

I am driving with the TPMS light on.  I am okay with that.  I am using the spare tire.  It's a full size wheel and tire, so I rotate it into use.  I visually inspect the tire.  I top off the air whenever I can, as I remember to do so.  I use a tire inflator, with a gauge which stops at the correct pressure.  Set the digital gauge to desired PSI, turn on the pump, and it automatically stops at the correct pressure.  For anyone who does not want to buy a tool like that, they can use the tire fill stations which are equipped with the same type of pump, at Costco or most tire shops.  

10965-a__63348.1543466841.jpg?c=2

For some people, they don't want to ignore the light.  They want the sensors to work properly, so that the light can actually warn them.  TPMS is an important safety feature.  That being said, if all of us were looking at our tires, and checking air pressure, there would be no need for TPMS.  We would see the obvious nail in the tire.  Air would always be topped off.  We would also see if the tread and sidewall appears damaged.

 

TPMS sensors on my truck are original, and that makes them about 13 years old.  Still working.  I wonder how long the TPMS on my Transit Connect will last.

 

 

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14 hours ago, Gideon said:

At the risk of being "a pain in the b****",  I will repeat: What is wrong with USING a $3 to $5 Tire Gauge and couple of minutes EASY work ???

Yes, ALL batteries eventually wear out.

What's NOT wrong is . . . . if you check your tires once a month, or twice a month or once a week, at least you will know exactly what your pressures are . . . . that day  -  That's much better than most of the driving public, so you're slightly ahead of the game

 

But, with some tires now costing upwards of $200 per corner it would be very nice to know when you've picked up a nail that's now causing a slow leak . . . . before you've driven far enough on the low tire to destroy it's structure.  *If* you discover that low tire during one of your weekly/monthly tire pressure checks, of course you immediately air it up and go looking for someone to patch the leak.  *If* they dismount the tire from the wheel to do a proper repair from the inside, a quick inspection will tell them if you've already destroyed the tire or not . . . . but many places will just offer you the quick $15 tire plug repair, air it up and send you on your way.  When the tire comes apart without any warning a month or so later, *maybe* you'll be able to keep it right side up and on the road and all you'll need is a tow back to the tire shop and a new tire

 

The other downside is, very few of us actually religiously keep to our own schedule of monthly/weekly tire pressure checks, even though we know how important they are, so our odds of catching the slow leak before it ruins a $200 tire are even slimmer than they might appear

 

What's really *nice* it to get behind the wheel, flick a switch on the steering wheel and see an actual readout of the pressure in all 4 tires before we even start the car.   Instead of a 'couple minutes of easy work' once a month, it's 5 seconds of no work at all every time you start the car.  There's nothing safer than that and the cost is less than replacing one tire.  If your car's system isn't that elaborate, at least knowing all 4 tires have enough air in them to keep the warning light from coming on is the next best thing  -  I still do my manual checks about once a month to replace the pound or two that usually leaks away every month . . . . but that low tire light NOT flashing on the dash is also VERY reassuring, at least it is to me

 

Don 

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Agreed, many years ago we were on vacation with the inlays driving 2 rental cars.  I noticed the other car had a very low tire.  In the very few miles to get to a gas station to put air in it the sidewall became too hot to comfortable touch with my hand.  This was driving at speeds less than 30MPH.  I know of BMW motorcycle owners who have received TMPS messages that indicated a deflating tire.  On a motorcycle that's very nice to know.  

 

When I first got my TC (2016 Titanium) it showed the pressures on all 4 tires but since then I have never been able to get it to do that.  My Volt shows all 4 tire pressures.

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@GideonIf it would give me an option to turn off the tire pressure warning I wouldn't be that annoyed with it. I could just teach my wife to check the tire pressure again and it would be fine. As it is, she's annoyed, so I'm annoyed. 

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51 minutes ago, manumit said:

@GideonIf it would give me an option to turn off the tire pressure warning I wouldn't be that annoyed with it. I could just teach my wife to check the tire pressure again and it would be fine. As it is, she's annoyed, so I'm annoyed. 

Mine has the option to just say "OK" and the warning goes away on the display. Light does stay on but I have leaned to ignore that. Half the wheels I run aren't sensor compatible so no matter what I do I can't fix that. If you didn't have to go through the "re-learning" process it wouldn't be so annoying for the wheels that actually do have sensors. Plug and play so to speak. 

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As suggested by many: a piece of tape over the light.

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18 hours ago, Beta Don said:

 

What's really *nice* it to get behind the wheel, flick a switch on the steering wheel and see an actual readout of the pressure in all 4 tires before we even start the car. 

 

 

The information is available.  I can see it with Forscan.  You could read the PSI of all four tires, and monitor it as you drive. 

Screenshot_20191221-143325.png

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9 hours ago, OLDSCHOOLFOOL said:

Half the wheels I run aren't sensor compatible so no matter what I do I can't fix that.

I'm trying to picture what sort of wheels those might be  -  I *thought* you could put a wheel sensor into just about *any* wheel. There are only three basic types of tire fill valves out there  -  The standard rubber 'snap in' valves, the high pressure snap in's and the high pressure metal clamp in's and there are sensor mounts to fit all 3, so no matter if your wheels are steel, some type of alloy or paper mache, if they utilize any one of the standard fill valves, there are sensors made which will fit them

 

I too like the direct readout of individual pressures on my 2017 Volt, but the OEM system on my TC suits my needs just fine as it is.  When i bought my set of Ford Focus alloys ro replace my stock steel wheels, the stock Ford snap in valves were still in the wheels, so transferring over the sensors took about 30 seconds each  -  Remove one screw from the stock wheel and install the sensor with that same screw into the 'new' alloys.  The tire installer installed 4 new valves and viola!, my TPMS system still works as it always has

 

Don 

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11 hours ago, Beta Don said:

I'm trying to picture what sort of wheels those might be  -  

 

I'm running some old (2000-2002) Jaguar alloy wheels. I think it may have to do with exactly where the valve stem is positioned. Tire shop said nope....they wouldn't be able to get the tire on without busting the sensor. I take their word for it, I could be wrong. Of course that only half the issue anyway.

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Jag wheels? Pics?

Nice thing about wheel covers though ... don't have to worry about confusing those silly TPMS sensors.  ;-}

 

 

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I have many times in the past been alerted to tire 'problems' [and alignment] by paying attention to how the car handles [smooth, low/no traffic road].  One time a tire was off by just 4-5 lbs but it was enough for me to notice.

 

I remember when my daughter was shopping for a car and liked the car but not its road 'manners'. Her description of its handling instigated a close look at the tires where 2 appeared low (visual). After getting the salesman to have the car serviced - he said they found the tires low - she tried the car again, and bought it.

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3 hours ago, sKiZo said:

Jag wheels? Pics?

Here is one. There are some more of some different wheels on Wheel Size Question thread. Pardon an old man for not being organized and having them collected in one place.

image.png.32dff3c3723934f1b2a26bdcd77dd66b.png

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