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Bigfoot

Replacing tires 2016 TC

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Hello,

 

I know there has been numerous post on tires already. I have read through them. My head was spinning a bit with all the suggestions of larger wheels, Etc.

My one question is.....I need to replace my factory tires. 16" rims and I am not changing.   These OEM Continental tires have worn

very well and handle well.. I do realize they are load rated and I will keep that of course. They are SO noisy and a really hard ride.

 

I'm looking for anyone who has replaced their's with good success in my 2 problem area's.

 

Thanks Bigfoot.

 

Thanks to all in advance

 

On a side note....Pictures coming tomorrow on my complete conversion !!

 

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Every time you bring up tires.......you will get more personal opinions than you need.  

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I run Hankook all-season tires. Went this route because of the price I got at 4wheelonline. So far, these tires are wearing well, and traction is good.

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 Pricing and availability trumps performance aspects for a lot of buyers.  Some people will spend whatever it cost to get "the best" tires for what they need.  High speed.  High traction.  Mud.  Snow.  But a lot of people buy whatever they can get the best price on.  

 

Hankooks are not bad tires.  They will not spontaneously split at the tread, blow at the sidewall, or any other catastrophic failure for no reason.  Ford used Hankook as OEM, selling all cars and trucks with them installed on the assembly line, when the relationship with Firestone ended.  Without a doubt, many other tires have better performance ratings.  But those tires cost more.  If you are not racing your Transit Connect, or off-roading your Transit Connect, you will not notice much of a difference driving around in the city and on highways.    

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Looks like they've partnered up with Continental (highest price group manufacturer) as well. 

 

I'm going to try Vredesteins next. My friend bought a set of these for his CR-V and the fuel economy has increased by a huge margin (half a litre per 100 km). Naturally, these are for summer only.

 

Profil_UltracSatin.jpg 

 

https://www.mytyres.co.uk/rshop/Tyres/Vredestein/Ultrac-Satin/225-60-ZR18-104W-XL-mit-Felgenschutzleiste--FSL-/R-316403

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Posted (edited)

When the Continentals were all done, I put a set of these on .  I went from 215-55-16 to 215-60-16  the ride improved .  The Speedometer error is 2 miles per hour.  It did not affect the shift quality.

Time will tell how they hold up.

Edited by G B L

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Posted (edited)

I heard about  tires from China, being dumped on the U.S.A. market at below market value pricing.  Meaning that Chinese companies are flooding the market with low pricing in order to gain market share.    

 

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2014/09/chinese-truck-tires-are-no-bargain/index.htm

 

Consumer Reports finds Chinese tire brands are no bargain

Beware of low-price pitch when it comes to these tires

Last updated: September 29, 2014 02:00 PM
 
Chinese-tires-Geostart-Pegasus-Sunny-ground

Find Ratings

Tires icon_lock.png 

 

With prices starting at just $89, less than half the cost of better-known models, tires from China may seem like an irresistible deal. That’s why, for the first time, Consumer Reports included a few Chinese brands in our latest tests: Geostar, Pegasus, and Sunny.

These were included in the recently published the results of testing 20 all-weather and all-season tires for light-duty pickups and SUVs. A fourth brand, from Aeolus, was tested but not reported when we couldn’t find a ready supply of tires for consumers. This supply issue seems to be a problem when buying “off brand” tires, because you don’t know whether the tires will be around for any length of time should you need a replacement.

Tires are a global commodity, and many of the major brand names that Consumer Reports tests are manufactured in China. But those tires are designed and manufactured to quality standards dictated by the original manufacturers. Chinese tire brands don’t have that oversight, and some may not have the marketing foresight to design products well-suited to the specific requirements of the U.S. consumer. While we can’t address specific tire build quality, our all-weather tests show that these tires simply don’t measure-up to most of the well-known brands. The tested tires from Geostar, Sunny, and Pegasus finished at the bottom of our ratings.

(Update: American Pacific Industries (API) told us that the tested Pegasus tire was not produced or distributed by an authorized Pegasus vendor. See note below.)

Chinese-Tires-Geostar-Pegasus-Sunny

The Geostar GS716 was the most well-rounded of the three, offering excellent dry braking, very good handling, and average tread life. But wet stopping performance was just average, and snow traction and stopping on ice was only fair. At $114 in our 265/70R17 test size, the Geostar tire might appeal to a cost-conscious buyer. Better known brand-name tires average about $150. The cost savings is attractive, but we’d caution you to not gloss over the performance shortfalls, as the Geostar mustered only an 18th place finish out of 20 models tested. The cheaper Sunny SN3606 ($89) and the unauthorized Pegasus Advanta SUV ($95) came in a dismal 19th and 20th, respectively. These tires stop reasonably well on pavement and offer impressive hydroplaning resistance, but they have poor snow traction and just fair ability to stop on icy roads. Both models have a stiff and noisy ride, plus they wear quickly, too.

Aside from the performance lows, if value is a high priority, consider that the Pegasus cost about half as much as a top-scoring tire, the Michelin LTX M/S2. But keep in mind that the Michelin will last almost three times longer. Factor in the cost of buying two additional sets of tires, plus mounting and balancing, and you could save hundreds of dollars, not to mention get a better all-weather performing tire, if you choose the Michelin.

Certainly if you are on tight budget, and who isn’t nowadays, buying a cheap tire is better than riding on worn-out tires. But as our tests show, buying bargain-priced tires such as these Chinese models isn’t the right choice for the long haul.

—Gene Petersen

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Update: 

Consumer Reports has removed its ratings for the Pegasus Advanta SUV tire originally reported on page 60 of our November issue and online. Although we purchased the tire through normal retail channels, Arizona-based American Pacific Industries (API) notified us that, based on the DOT tire identification code on our tires, the model tested was not produced or distributed by an authorized Pegasus vendor. The “unauthorized” Pegasus tires performed relatively poorly for snow traction and tread life. We have not tested “authorized” Pegasus tires.

 

 

 

Edited by Fifty150

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I tried these Toyo Extensa A/S tires and was quite impressed with how smooth they rode and how quiet they were. Don't think they are available in the stock 215/55R16 size though. I used 225/55R16 instead which is very close. The Continentals didn't stay on long enough to wear out but tires seldom do on my vehicles. 

 

Image result for toyo extensa a/s

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The tires that I purchased had a good rating were made in  Thailand.  I am running two sets on two different vehicles.  When I mounted them they were very round easy to mount and No tire took More than 1 oz to balance .

As they ware I will keep you up dated .

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In my area, there is an outlet of 4 Wheel Parts.  The store manager once told me that since they were an arm of Transamerican Auto Parts, there is no advertised price that they can't match, for any auto part (car or truck).  Especially tires.  He laughed and joked about how tires are "on sale" every day, all year around.  Tire pricing is a grey market.  All tire pricing is based upon market fluctuations, consumer demand, and available inventory.  There is no fixed price to any tire, that any seller or all sellers, will recognize.  If you have a good relationship with your corner garage, and that guy has a good rep from the distributor, you could get a better deal.  Or not.  Sometimes the best prices are passed down from wholesaler, to distributor, to large volume seller like Costco or Sears Auto Center, just because they have too many in the warehouse and need to move them.  Surely, nationwide chains are able to negotiate better pricing, corner the market in certain popular sizes and brands, then mark them all up to offer a mark down.  Now enter Amazon.  Are they even warehousing inventory with tires?  Several times I ordered tires online, from various web stores, only to get a drop-off from a local distributor, with a parts runner in a pickup truck.  Once, I even knew the guy driving the the truck.  Apparently, a lot of online websites are just brokering your purchase.  Amazon now sells tires, delivered to Sears Auto Center, who will perform the installation, then offer you the warranty on road hazards and perform your rotations.  

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Just ordered tires on Amazon.  On the webpage with the tire, there is an option for installation.  I choose Sears Auto.  $19.99 per tire for installation.  Amazon will deliver to Sears, then I bring my car in.  

 

Pretty easy so far.  And the tires on Amazon are a lot less expensive.

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Reifendirekt is doing the same thing in Europe, with free delivery. Very reasonable prices as well.

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From what little I know, tires are kind of a "gray market". 

 

Around here, a handful of distributors sell all the same tires, to different tire shops and garages.  Different distributors may have access to particular brands and sizes, then trade amongst themselves to control pricing.  The shops never know what may be available at what price, as it could change daily, depending on what each distributor wants to do.  They could announce sales, rebates, et cetera to push certain brands, styles, sizes......or hold back and price up something popular.  Suddenly, there is an artificial lack of availability for snow tires, where they will make you order & wait for delivery, to justify a higher price.  When if fact, they have a warehouse full, because the factory produced a large volume right before winter.  

 

Shops who move higher volume, get better availability, and lower pricing with incentives.  Smaller shops sometimes have to pay a distributor more than what a retail customer may pay from a larger shop.  But that is how a free market works.  That is how Wal*Mart can buy & sell volume at lower price points.

 

Now comes the online sellers.  They have muscle to flex.  They can order more from a factory than a regional distributor.  They can command a larger shipment, with priority.  They can sell at a huge discount because they are getting distributor pricing, and selling directly to the end user. 

 

The problem now, for the end user, is how do you get that tire installed.  Most people that I know, do not have the equipment to mount & balance tires.  

 

Independent tire shops will charge up to triple for installation if you carry in the tire.  Wal*Mart charges $13 per tire.  Costco wants $15 per tire.  But they will only install an OEM size tire onto an OEM wheel.  They will not install a different size tire onto an aftermarket wheel. Independent shops and garages have quoted $30 - $40.  Chains like Big-O, Firestone, Midas, et cetera all have franchisees who could set their own pricing, quote low, then add on hidden charges later.  Same way the $19.95 coupon oil change becomes $50 out the door.  

 

Some tire shops refuse to install any tire which they didn't sell. 

 

Independent shops will not accept your shipment, knowing that you are not going to stay home from work, accept 4 tires from the delivery person, then drive around with 4 tires in your car, from shop to shop, looking for installation.  I remember loading 4 tires into my pickup, driving them over to drop off at a tire shop, then going home to drive my car over to the shop.  But I figured that if I am saving $100 per tire, then it's not so bad to pay for the installation.  

 

But pricing isn't a fair comparison.  Amazon.com has 215/55R16 sized tires around $50.  But those are tires from Chinese brands nobody has heard of.  As opposed to walking into a tire store and being quoted $150 for a brand that you have heard of like Goodyear, Firestone, BF Goodrich, Toyo, et cetera.  I'm taking the chance that here in The U.S.A., unsafe, unrated tires cannot be sold.  Or that at least Amazon.com is not selling illegal tires. 

 

Supposedly, tires sold in The U.S.A. must meet regulatory standards.  https://www.nhtsa.gov/equipment/tires  https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/title49/section/393.75  But the truth is that there is very little oversight and enforcement.  

 

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1 hour ago, mrtn said:

Reifendirekt is doing the same thing in Europe, with free delivery. Very reasonable prices as well.

 

 

Are those low price tires from a Chinese company which nobody has heard of?

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For many years I’ve bought tires online usually because they were not available locally.  I’ve used a couple of local shops which do good work who mount the tires for me.  Before they were a big name I ran Yohahama ultra performance tires on my BMW.  Never had a problem.  I’m picky about tires and brakes as they help avoid accidents.  The whole car parts marketplace has gotten much more competitive and difficult in recent years and it is sometimes hard to know which cheap part is good quality.  As for tires I’ve been running Michelin and Continental on my cars.  Wife’s Smart car runs an unusual size which is also expensive.  Motorcycles have run Michelin Pilot Road 2, 3 and 4s except on the Ninja ran Bridgestone S20 and S21s.  Around here it usually doesn’t get that cold and if it snows the cars stay in the garage.  Doesn’t matter what tire I’ve got, folks can’t drive in warm dry weather much less inclement weather.  Snow and ice plus one of them makes for a great YouTube video.  

 

Of of couse some pu and SUV drivers are good.

84152375-66D6-4006-B85F-EAF76EA247E3.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

For many years I’ve bought tires online usually because they were not available locally.  I’ve used a couple of local shops which do good work who mount the tires for me.  Before they were a big name I ran Yohahama ultra performance tires on my BMW.  Never had a problem.  I’m picky about tires and brakes as they help avoid accidents.

 

I agree 100%.  I never buy cheap tires and always try to use OEM or better quality.  No matter what you pay for them, tires are cheaper than fenders and the difference between hydroplaning into a ditch at high speed is often just a matter of how great (or not) your tires are.  I never run them very close to the wear bars either for the same reason

 

I usually buy from Tire Rack or Amazon and I have a local shop install them  -  Sometimes, the total cost is about the same in the end as having a dealer install whatever el-cheapo tires he's promoting at the moment

 

Don

Edited by Beta Don

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Posted (edited)

Can anyone confirm the mileage rating on the OEM tires, Conti Pro Contact Extra Load?

My notes when I bought the van in 2015 are showing 80,000 miles, but I'm not seeing that online now.

 

The reason I'm asking is that on my last oil change at 15,000 miles when tires were rotated (done very 5,000 miles), the service advisor told me the tread is down to 30% and I should replace the tires. I'm not surprised because the tire wear on my last vehicle, Volvo 850 wagon, was terrible, usually 15,000 or less. Most of my miles are on a very windy and mountainous canyon road en route to the beach and I'm usually hustling to get there and back home. With the Volvo wagon, an alignment tech once took a look at my tire wear and asked me if I drive around in circles. I laughed and explained my driving pattern. He compensated the alignment to help that. I ended up getting tires that had a good proration policy so help absorb the replacement cost, even though I was still shelling out money for mounting fees and damage coverage. I thought part of the problem was the vehicle so I was hoping the TC would do better with this issue, but it looks like I'm having the same issues. 

 

Has anyone else had poor wear on their OEM tires and if so did they try to get a proration discount on them when replacing?

Tire warranty guide posted below.

 

I asked the dealer if they will prorate the cost of the tire and he gave me this blank stare. He said he didn't know about doing that and didn't seem to care about finding out if they could. It seems when they can't make top dollar on something their enthusiasm of helping you quickly goes away. Par for the course at a dealership.

 

And then the question goes out if I can get them prorated at a local tire shop, should I stick with the OEM tire or a Conti equivalent or jump to a different brand and skip the proration? I would try another brand if I found a tire that would give me more tread miles based on my heavy usage.

 

Thanks for the help!

 

2015-Tire-Warranty-Guide-version-4_tirtw_EN-US_02-2014.pdf

Edited by windguy

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6 hours ago, windguy said:

 

 

last oil change at 15,000 miles when tires were rotated (done very 5,000 miles), the service advisor told me the tread is down to 30% and I should replace the tires

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hokum!

 

Sounds to me like the service advisor was feeling you out to see what else he could talk you into.  There is no way that your tires could be that worn, at 15,000 miles.  Almost 20,000 miles on my OEM tires, and they still look new.  Looks don't mean anything.  Go measure the tread.  

 

There are several popular ways to check your tire tread depth. One easy way is the penny test. Simply insert a penny into your tire's tread groove with Lincoln's head upside down and facing you. If you can see all of Lincoln's head, your tread depth is less than 2/32 inch and it's time to replace your tires.

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12 hours ago, PhotoAl said:

 

The whole car parts marketplace has gotten much more competitive and difficult in recent years and it is sometimes hard to know which cheap part is good quality.

 

 

 

 

 

It all depends on the part.  Certain brands we are familiar with, just because we see them everywhere.  But that doesn't make it good.  Dorman, Wagner , Four Seasons, Champion, Fram.........you've heard of the brand, but the parts are nothing special.  I find that unless it is a specialty aftermarket part, like FlowMaster muffler, Eibach shocks, & PowerStop brakes, your best bet is OEM.  Buy a Motorcraft part for your Ford.  What good is saving $5 on a thermostat, if it doesn't work?

 

 

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12 hours ago, PhotoAl said:

 

 

 

 

12 hours ago, PhotoAl said:

 

Of of couse some pu and SUV drivers are good.

84152375-66D6-4006-B85F-EAF76EA247E3.jpeg

 

 

 

 

Owners of AWD SUV tend to overestimate their vehicle's ability, and their own driving skills.  I've learned over the years that even if you do not have a great amount of experience driving in snow, reducing speed makes a world of difference.  I see a lot of people actually cutting in and out of traffic, and speeding beyond the posted speed limit (meant for dry roads) in those little cross-over type sports utility vehicles which do not have a true 4 wheel drive system.  Most people that I know with 4 wheel drive, like with a Jeep or truck, would never drive like that.  

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, windguy said:

 

 

 

Has anyone else had poor wear on their OEM tires and if so did they try to get a proration discount on them when replacing?

Tire warranty guide posted below.

 

 

 

 

2015-Tire-Warranty-Guide-version-4_tirtw_EN-US_02-2014.pdf

 

 

After reading the warranty, it seems like nothing is covered.  Unless the tire is defective.  Meaning that what you describe does not sound like the tire was defective, and your tires are simply worn down because of normal use.  

 

I think what they would consider a defect would be tread separation.  If through no fault of your own, and they will try to blame you, the tread comes off.  It could happen.  But not likely to happen.  

Related image

 

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Most tire companies are open to pro-rated replacements. 

Not through warranties, since those are ALWAYS for manufacturer's defects, but through Road Hazard insurance.  It's an inexpensive add on at purchase, and WELL worth it.  Road Hazard usually even covers abnormal wear from alignment issues, since those can be blamed on potholes taking out your alignment.

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The Continentals on My TC were thin at about 35000 miles .Most of the tirerack reviews are between 30000 and 40000 miles .  My experience with road hazard seems to  be dealer dependent.

Windguy  Did  your dealer tell you the tread depth?   Give us a picture of a front and  Rear tire.

Last Year I got a great deal on a Tire machine .  Between the cars and trucks and Trailers in my fleet I have already paid for the machine.  The Internet and free shipping has really made the tire experience much better.

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8 hours ago, Fifty150 said:

 

 

 

There are several popular ways to check your tire tread depth. One easy way is the penny test. Simply insert a penny into your tire's tread groove with Lincoln's head upside down and facing you. If you can see all of Lincoln's head, your tread depth is less than 2/32 inch and it's time to replace your tires.

 

KIMG2105.JPG

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