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toddy

What I must concern to drive Ford CNG TC? Any hidden cost?

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I am retired and like an used CNG TC van, but no idea about its range, maintenance cost, valves (?). Can I drive it across the country? Thanks in advance any answers.

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The major issues with CNG are where to fill if going out of your area..The price for fuel is important because it has less energy than Gasolene .

If the equipment is in good shape you should have no issues with how it runs.

 

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18 hours ago, toddy said:

 Can I drive it across the country? 

 

 

Your real issue will be planning refueling stops.  You can't go somewhere where CNG is not available.  Technically, you can go there.  You just won't be able to turn around and come home.  

 

CNG vehicles require expert maintenance.  Not every corner mechanic will know their way around a CNG system.  There are probably different seals which need to be serviced, along with a pressurized system, which most mechanics simply are not trained in.  

 

I would personally not choose a vehicle with a fuel system, where the fuel is not widely available.  It's not like an alternative fuel, such as E85 or bio-diesel, where you can always use gas or regular diesel.  You must use CNG.  And with CNG, you can't simply get as couple of Jerry cans, and carry extra fuel for long trips.  

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Looks like I must give up CNG Ford CT and get conventional gasoline van.

 

The problem of oil price has started since Henry Ford produced first car in 1908, then the  crash in 1929, Depression in 1932, broke and quit VN war,  crash in 1987, costed both Pdt Carter and Pdt Bush a second term because of poverty growth, crash in 2001, Iraq invasion, great Depression in 2008 again.  Major deficit or debt of our country is from oil imports.

 

This must finish. 

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Ween yourself from driving. Take public transportation. Ride a bus.  Ride a bike.  Walk.  

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I think he needs a Volt, Bolt or Tesla  -  Electricity is everywhere . . . . and it's not tied to the price of oil

 

Don

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5 hours ago, Beta Don said:

I think he needs a Volt, Bolt or Tesla  -  Electricity is everywhere . . . . and it's not tied to the price of oil

 

But it's still tied to similar amount (or more) of CO2 pollution.

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Environment footprint is not decreased.  All of those environmental harmful batteries being produced. Fossil fuel producing electricity.  Delivery of electricity.  Different waste and pollution at the end of vehicle life.  You think Prius batteries are beneficial to the environment? It's just shifting the pollution point.

 

A perfect world option is not yet on the market.  

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Posted (edited)

Every body has free choice. Tesla is very convenient.

 

I like hydrogen fuel because it comes from water and free solar energy. Add on same engine of conventional car. It is suitable for my retirement budget.

 

Wonder how much does it cost to add second tank for Ford TC CNG?

 

 

Edited by toddy

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3 hours ago, toddy said:

I like hydrogen fuel because it comes from water and free solar energy. Add on same engine of conventional car. It is suitable for my retirement budget.

Wonder how much does it cost to add second tank for Ford CNG?

Vehicle CNG tanks are VERY expensive.  CNG is stored at extremely high pressure, nothing ;like LPG.  Tanks rated for vehicles are heavy steel or aluminum and then wrapped in many layers of fiberglass, necessary to keep them from EXPLODING in an accident.  Honda sold CNG cars in the US (Only Washington, Oregon and California I think) for several years 15 or 20 years back.  You refueled at home overnight using a little pump which could generate the 3500 psi or so it takes to fill the tank

 

Hydrogen fueled cars are great . . . . if you live in Iceland.  It's pretty hard to find refueling stations anywhere else.  They use geothermal steam to produce the electricity to break water down into Oxygen and Hydrogen  -  A very energy intensive process.  You could probably drive an electric car 1,000 miles on the amount of solar electricity you would need to generate enough hydrogen to power your car 100 miles.  Truly a neat idea, but hardly practical, which is why you won't find a hydrogen refueling station on any corner in the USA anytime soon

 

Don

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Solar recharge electric is a distant dream away.  Technology is not there yet.  Electric motors may be our future.  Or the future may hold different technology yet to be invented.  

 

I'm not a fan of current electric cars.  They fall short of what my needs are.  My viewpoint is biased by life experience.  

 

Propane is interesting.  It would be nice to drive around and refuel by switching BBQ tanks.  You can go camping, and fry a turkey, also.  

 

 

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I don't think a bbq set level connections are doable in an automotive application.

I need to get mine serviced soon. I'm enjoying LPG a lot when it works.

 

 

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Just a little daydream of mine.  Imagine being able to fill up the back of your van with BBQ fuel canisters and then driving all over the continent without worry of fluctuating pricing, no fuel availability, or just running out of fuel in the middle of nowhere.  And anytime you get hungry, you can hook up your portable propane grill or stove.SAM_0044.jpg

Related imageRelated imageImage result for propane stove top

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Oh yeah, here's an idea for you:

 

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15 hours ago, Fifty150 said:

Solar recharge electric is a distant dream away.  Technology is not there yet.  Electric motors may be our future.  Or the future may hold different technology yet to be invented.  

 

I'm not a fan of current electric cars.  They fall short of what my needs are.  My viewpoint is biased by life experience.  

 

We've been driving EV's as our daily drivers now for more than 7 years.  There are LOTS of EV owners who recharge at home using 100% solar power every day . . . . and many of the Tesla recharging stations have huge solar arrays.  Solar charging cars is neither a dream, nor a distant one  -  It's been happening for years

 

I do agree that an EV is not the answer for every trip everyone needs to make, obviously, as we also own a TC.  But, for most of the population, an EV is perfect for most of the daily trips they need to make  -  In our case, we have to keep a trickle charger on the TC to keep the battery up for those times we need to use it.  Day in and day out, we drive pure electric cars and occasionally (couple times a month) we drive our Chevy Volt for trips too long to make in our EV's

 

I'm a firm believer in using the most practical vehicle for the trips I need to make  -  On the opposite end of that spectrum are those who daily commute in a 6 passenger pickup that has neither hauled anything, towed anything or gone anywhere with more than two passengers for several weeks.  They *might* need to tow something 2% of the time, they might need to haul something that won't fit in a car (a standard sized washer or dryer will fit in the back of our little Mitsubishi EV's) 5% of the time and they might need to go somewhere with more than 4 or 5 people 10% of the time . . . . so of course they bought a truck to drive everyday.  If they had one more practical vehicle for those everyday one or two person trips and only drove the truck when they needed a truck, that same $40,000 truck would last them 30 years and they'd never have to buy another one

 

EV's don't 'fall short' of many of your needs  -  They may not meet your every need, but they're certainly practical for many, if not most of them

 

Don

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Most people only drive to commute.  They don't need to own a car.  There are alternatives.  Car ownership is a luxury item.  I own several vehicles.  I still see the value in taking the bus.  Obviously, we don't all live where the bus service is good.  I get that.  Public transportation is also a luxury item.  Ask anyone who lives in a big city.  Taking busses, Subway, ferry service......way better than stop and go traffic and no parking.  Not to mention the higher insurance, higher gas prices, and paying $20 an hour for parking.

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Many people obviously don't live in a place anything like you describe.  We have no 'stop and go' traffic.  I've never paid a dime to park anywhere.  Our city has bus service, but it doesn't run within about 10 miles of where I live, so a 10 mile walk to catch the bus wouldn't be a good option.  For sure we need to own a car or we couldn't live where we do . . . . we might have to move to where there is stop and go traffic like you describe and paying $20 to park  -  We wouldn't call that 'living'  -  We'd call that 'surviving' and we just wouldn't care to live like that

 

I would say most people do indeed need to own a car  -  Maybe a lucky 10% or so could survive without one . . . . but then are they really 'lucky'? . . . . or just surviving

 

Don

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Back to the original post a CNG TC is nothing to be afraid of, I think all are dual fuel.  Meaning they are sold new as gasoline with a tank like normal under the vehicle then an aftermarket installer installs the CNG or LP tanks in the cargo area and the vehicle has a switch to change fuel types.

 

 

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9 hours ago, dinocarsfast said:

Back to the original post a CNG TC is nothing to be afraid of, I think all are dual fuel.  Meaning they are sold new as gasoline with a tank like normal under the vehicle then an aftermarket installer installs the CNG or LP tanks in the cargo area and the vehicle has a switch to change fuel types. 

 

 

Thanks, hope I can drive across the country to see national parks.  In the previous inspections, I did not see any special switch or button on the front panel.  

I foresee Tesla would win with battery capacitors, but age people like me belong to the generation of the combustion engine and very nervous with new tech.

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