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Whorley

Partition for a TC Passanger

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Hello.

 

We just bought our first Connect to haul dogs around to dog shows. My wife really wanted a passenger version so we would have windows all around. We bought a 2018 Transit Connect Passanger version. I have removed all of the rear seats and mounted a crate in the back. My question Is has anyone fuond a metal dog partition that mounts well in a passanger version? I have found lots for a cargo version, but can’t seem to find any for the passanger version.

Thanks

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Welcome and congrats on your TC.  Don't know much about the partition but the cargo and passenger versions are pretty much the same except for the floor area.  The cargo versions have a cover over the footwell.  I would think it might not be too difficult to adapt but not sure.  With the passenger version you get the rear temp controls which can be adjusted from the front if your arms are long enough and flexible enough. 

 

I have a 2016 TC Titanium LWB wagon.  I do notice more noise when all the seats are folded and have the WeatherTech matt on top.  It's been driven one time since late February, I mostly just ride my scooter when going to check on immediate family members.

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14 hours ago, Whorley said:

has anyone fuond a metal dog partition that mounts well in a passanger version?

 

 

I see a lot of commercial grade equipment. Most of these mount permanently, meaning that you have to bolt them in.  It may not be what you really want. You could have something made by a metal shop.

 

 

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How big are your dogs? There's the OEM van partitition with a pass-through door for long items to extend into passenger footwell. This might work for smaller dogs.

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Here's what's left of mine ... 

 

19nov-bed.jpg

 

I left the passenger side (minus the upper grate) mostly because it's a convenient place for the inverter and other electricals. Also, it clears the bed when the couch gets folded out and gives me a few more inches to stretch.

 

And ya, I've heard the gloom 'n doom yer gonna die thing from stuff flying out the back already. I rate that pretty low on my list of things to worry about. Lot depends I suppose on what you do with the vehicle - mine's going for wheel chair access, overnight camping, local hardware runs ...

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PLAN B:

 

I used a net tail gate thingie to keep groceries in the back of the bed when shopping. I added lightweight metal rods top and bottom with zip ties, and the gate just strapped into a couple brackets on the side. Just pop the straps and roll it up when not in use. You could double the height just using two of the gates, and they're super strong, and not too expensive.

 

grocery-catcher.jpg

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I don't know if a tailgate net will contain dogs in a Transit Connect.

 

 

On 3/26/2020 at 9:13 AM, Whorley said:

haul dogs around to dog shows

 

On 3/26/2020 at 9:13 AM, Whorley said:

has anyone fuond a metal dog partition that mounts well in a passanger version?

 

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5 hours ago, sKiZo said:

I used a net tail gate thingie to keep groceries in the back of the bed when shopping.

When I shop, I use a couple of ice chest. It keeps everything cool and fresh until I get home. 

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On 3/27/2020 at 3:37 PM, sKiZo said:

And ya, I've heard the gloom 'n doom yer gonna die thing from stuff flying out the back already. I rate that pretty low on my list of things to worry about. Lot depends I suppose on what you do with the vehicle - mine's going for wheel chair access, overnight camping, local hardware runs ...

 

I remember hearing way back that a 1lb can of whatever (soup, beans, etc) flying forward, unsecured, in a crash from 55mph will have something like 70lbs of localized impact force (good ole momentum!) when it meets the back of your head after an accident. Take a 70lb soup-can-sledge-hammer hit to the back of your head and it'll be closed casket, lol. It's been a couple decades since I heard the numbers, so I may not remember them exactly correct, but it's still a lot of force. If we have a physics whiz, they could crunch the numbers and figure out the exact impact force. 

I've seen the damage that a half-full cooler does to a back seat in a 1995 Saturn coupe, the seatback was heavily curved after the accident. It was my own, so I wasn't seeing aftermath of someone else's accident, lol. Even better, my genius ex-gf (dating at the time) had one leg up on the door with the window down, well her foot hit the side mirror with enough force to send the mirror flying like 40+ft away from the car. Her other leg was on top of the dash; needless to say, the air bag bruises on the back of her legs lasted for a good year afterwards before they completely disappeared finally. She had said she's learned her lesson about keeping her feet on the floor where they belong. 

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A good tiedown is essential. I once drove back (2.5h drive) from an event where I had lots of random stuff to haul back to the town. Being really OCD about cargo tiedown I had loaded everything like a perfect Tetris stack. The back of my 2006 TC was two thirds full of sporting goods, printers, dishes, coffee machine etc. So I was driving through the forest in the middle of the night, tired as hell after the event having worked 30h in a row an elk couple ran over the road. They were far enough but I instinctively braked as hard as I could. Could not hear even a drinking glass move in the back. Complete silence. I congratulated myself and kept driving.

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Note to self ... no soup cans or half full coolers in the back. ;-}

 

Besides - pretty sure my foil hat will protect me! 

 

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2 hours ago, sKiZo said:

pretty sure my foil hat will protect me

 

 

That's only good to interfere with radio signals from the government implant in your brain.  

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On 3/30/2020 at 1:55 PM, sKiZo said:

Note to self ... no soup cans or half full coolers in the back. ;-}

 

 

Or pallets of concrete.

 

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On 4/7/2020 at 10:28 PM, Fifty150 said:

Or pallets of concrete.

 

 

And that's at only 31 MPH, essentially residential neighborhood speeds, lol. 

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It looks like the pallet was actually strapped down.  And it also looked like the strap was the skinny, 1" size, which is not adequate for that amount of weight.  1 pallet of small concrete boxes is a little over 1 ton.  Was that van overloaded?  There was no bulkhead partition.  And the dummy wasn't wearing PPE.

 

 

 

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Vito van is one notch above the TC capability, so approx 800-1300 kg payload depending on the configuration. The ratchet straps were definitely wrong. 

 

Whenever I load something big in my van for a trip I stuff the space between the pallet and bulkhead. I have a pile of different stuffed cardboard boxes and bubble wrap in my warehouse for that.

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WOW, when I haul my scooter I always put it in the center just in case something like that happens and the straps were to fail it would go between the seats.  I use multiple straps, one is a 3" belt and the other two 1.5"  for a scooter that weight about 250 pounds.  Good point about loose stuff in the back.  Hauling stuff always like to put heavy stuff down low.

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