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Does anyone have any experience with these BF Goodrich tires? Light snow use is what I'm mainly interested in. We don't get an enormous amount of snow in VA, but some. Snow tires are generally an ugly sort with limited sizes but these are pretty good looking tires and I can get the size I want.

Image result for BFGoodrich g-Force COMP-2 A/SBFGoodrich g-Force COMP-2 A/S

 

Yeah, I know it is almost July.:)

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13 hours ago, OLDSCHOOLFOOL said:

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah, I know it is almost July.:)

 

 

This is the best time of the year to buy a Christmas tree too.

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Being the miserly old cuss that I am ... I buy whatever's on sale when I need to replace my tires.

I think the last brand I bought was ... "Okayyear"?  "Hankooky"?  "Fired Stone"?  Something like that.

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Linglong is the best ever. As a name.

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Posted (edited)

When China is saturating our market by selling tires as a loss leader, politics go out the window.  I don't care about the conspiracy to control our market, and the long term effect on the economy.  I am getting cheap tires.

Edited by Fifty150

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9 hours ago, Fifty150 said:

..and the long term effect...

 

It’s linglong term.

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If anyone is paying attention, Ford went from selling every car and truck with Firestone, to Hankook.  Korean.  Kim Jung Dennis Rodman.

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That would be SOUTH Korean ... not north.

 

I'll be dead before China gets full control ... and I don't have any brats to leave stuff to.

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31 minutes ago, Mike Chell said:

 

 

l ... and I don't have any brats to leave stuff to.

 

 

No problem.  Several billion Chinese would love to inherit your stuff.

 

Ever thought about adoption?  Apparently it is customary and ordinary for lawyers to adopt the inmates that they represent.  

 

https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Lawyers-Adoption-of-Inmate-Stuns-Legal-Experts-2956875.php

 

Lawyers' Adoption of Inmate Stuns Legal Experts / Type of law not often used in attorney-client relationships, they say

Harriet Chiang, Chronicle Legal Affairs Writer

 
Published 4:00 am, Thursday, February 1, 2001
  •  

News that the lawyers whose dog mauled a San Francisco woman to death have adopted the animal's prior owner -- a prison inmate and a member of the Aryan Brotherhood -- has veteran family attorneys shaking their heads in disbelief.

Adult adoptions are not unusual, but when Robert Noel, 59, and Marjorie Knoller, 45, became the parents of 38-year-old Paul John "Cornfed" Schneider, now serving time in Pelican Bay for aggravated assault and attempted murder, it turned a tragic situation into a bizarre one.

Adoption lawyers and scholars say they have never heard of a lawyer adopting an adult client, a situation that raises a spectrum of ethical issues.

"I don't know what's going on in this dog case," said Nordin Blacker, a prominent San Francisco family lawyer. "This seems particularly strange."

 
 

The adoption granted this week in San Francisco family court may seem odd, but it's perfectly legal. California allows an adult to adopt another adult with few restrictions. While child adoptions involve background checks, interviews and home visits, adult adoptions are treated like any other agreement between consenting adults and are usually rubber-stamped by a judge.

The motivation is usually financial. It's a common pattern for an older person with no living children to adopt a younger adult so they can inherit their estate, according to Joan Hollinger, a visiting professor at Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law and a nationally known expert on adoption law. Meanwhile, the new parent doesn't have any duty to provide financial support because the adoptee is over 18.

 
 

There can be emotional as well as financial incentives. "Sometimes there's a legal recognition of an informal relationship that's been going on for years, " Hollinger said.

Judge Thomas Hansen, who presided over Santa Clara County's adoption calendar for two years, said he saw only a handful of adult adoptions. "The only thing I'm concerned about is whether both the adopting person and the adoptee have filed written consents," he said.

Adult adoptions typically involve a stepparent who wants to adopt the spouse's children but can't get the consent of the other biological parent. Once the stepchildren become adults, they can be adopted without the consent of their natural parents.

Boalt's Hollinger said a well-worn practice has been for older men who are still legally married to adopt their mistresses.

But she cautioned that the adoption can be ended as easily as it is formed, as long as both sides give written consent.

There are a handful of adult adoption cases involving gay or lesbian couples seeking legal protection. A 57-year-old New York man tried to adopt his 50-year-old partner after the two had been together for 25 years. But in a 1984 decision, New York's highest court blocked the deal, saying that adoption couldn't be used as a "quasi-matrimonial vehicle."

Gay or lesbian couples rarely resort to adoption as a means to gain inheritance, retirement or insurance benefits, according to Kate Kendell, executive director of the National Center for Lesbian Rights in San Francisco.

"It's not a plausible option," she said. Usually a couple will try to preserve some rights in their relationship by drawing up legal documents, which may be inadequate, she said, but at least provide some protection.

While the lawyers' adoption of Schneider is final, it may pose future ethical problems.

 

 

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Glad your questions was only about tires, Loafer  -  If you had asked about anything else, it could have gone off the rails pretty quickly!

 

Don

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I won't bring my beliefs into a fun thread ... but just suffice it to say, I can't stand children.  I didn't have any by choice, knew I wouldn't like them even if they were "mine". 

I'd never adopt (or like) someone else's brat.

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I wonder what kind of tires they used in prison.

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Reading through this thread I would say that's a no on the tires.

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So-called "all season" tires tend to be mediocre across all uses & situations. Whereas dedicated summer tires are great in late-spring/summer/early-fall and snow tires are great from late-fall to early-spring. It's a little extra hassle & expense, but it goes along the "use the right tool for the job" saying. 

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3 hours ago, jrm223 said:

So-called "all season" tires tend to be mediocre across all uses & situations

 

As I have always said, it means equally bad in All Seasons.

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Yet, a lot of people, myself included, buy All Seasons for a number of reasons.  

 

I live in a climate that has not seen snow since the 70's.  So winter tires are out.  Tire shops laugh at you if you ask for tires with studs.  We are mostly dry, but go from drought to heavy rainfall.  

 

I buy tires based upon pricing and availability.  This means that I end up with whatever the lowest price is, at the moment that I need to buy tires.  No considerations for performance factors because I am not driving a sports car.  As per usual, snow tire, mud tires, aggressive tread, are all more expensive.  If the tire has the correct load rating for my car, that's my biggest concern.  I don't care if the warranty is for 40,000 or 65,000 miles.  I am the driver who has never lost control in bad weather because my tires were on sale, and I had a coupon.  When it's wet, I drive slower.  When I have a full load, and the weight balance is different, I drive slower.  

 

There is a market for All Season tires.  Most drivers do not want to own and store 2 sets of tires, and then twice a year, have to change them out.  Maybe they don't have anywhere to store those extra wheels and tires.  Or they are just too lazy to change the tires.  Or like me, they were on sale and there was a coupon.  With All Season, you are not going off-road, you are not going to the track, you are not going into a snow storm, you are not going into the mud bog.  But you are getting into your daily driver, for your daily commute, on a moderately maintained public road, and your part of the country sees zero snow.  

 

So All Season is not ideal for any or every condition.  It does not have the best speed rating, traction, or rolling resistance.  Yet, a lot of people buy them.  Almost like a Swiss Army Knife.  Every tool on a Swiss Army Knife is not the best of anything.  But it is okay, and may work, when there is nothing else available.  Just yesterday, I used a pair of locking pliers because I didn't have a set of nut drivers.  

 

 

Come to think of it, unless the tires have a performance aspect, every other tire in the shop is rated "All Season".  At least that how it is where I live.  Tire shops will have performance tires for fast cars, aggressive lug tread pattern for trucks, then all the other tires will be rated "All Season".  

 

7 hours ago, OLDSCHOOLFOOL said:

Reading through this thread I would say that's a no on the tires.

 

I have no idea what your level of snow is.  5", 10", 4'?  I don't know what your driving ability is in snow.  With your front wheel drive Transit Connect, do you think that you can maintain control of your vehicle with All Season tires & snow chains?

 

Those tires could work.

 

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I was asking about the BFGoodrich g-Force COMP-2 A/S...specifically. Or trying to anyway.:)

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It's a front wheel drive van.  Those tires should work.  Assuming that where you live, the government operates snow removal machines on the public roads, and as you say, you don't get an enormous amount of snow.  And you have the sense to own some sort of snow traction device, and use it when needed.  

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