Jump to content
  • Custom Search


KevinRollin

Vintage Technologies sliding windows

Recommended Posts

PI got them both in!  Second one on the other side went in infinitely easier.  The second one I moved back about an inch and there was less interference with the body metal.  

 

Instead of tracing the trim ring, I used the template that I’d measured/made when I was trying to determine if the windows would fit.  I fit it into the right spot on the inside then drilled two locating holes.  Observing the correct orientation (make an arrow toward the front or something) transfer the template to the outside and use two screws to hold it in place.  

 

73B90E11-5144-4340-BD60-6B72ECC62B09.jpeg

ED9EB809-8FC0-4527-9C72-70C99C95A79F.jpeg

I did this cut same as me as the first, with a Dremel tool and spiral cut bit.  

 

Window went in fine.  I realized that regardless of positioning, a 24x15 window is too large to fit flush with the curved side plastic panels.  Just too big.  A smaller window would fit more flush.  So I caulked the outside edge.  

958E3A6F-E698-4E80-A431-78E955B41A5C.jpeg

 

53A8873B-2759-4D7D-8327-E6AF0CB94F86.jpeg

 

 

 

Edited by KevinRollin
Photo order

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is that Dynaflex in addition to the butyl tape that is supposed to be used in/under the window frame? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, jrm223 said:

So is that Dynaflex in addition to the butyl tape that is supposed to be used in/under the window frame? 

Vintage Technologies doesn’t provide much in the way of instructions.  There is a soft rubber gasket around the window, where some other windows use butyl tape.  I used caulk to seal the edge of the window to the body panel, outboard of the rubber seal.  

 

On the portions of the window that tough the radius of the panel it’s probably not necessary, but there are spots where it doesn’t contour.  I was worried water would pool there and seep in.  

5CBB2011-4156-47FF-8E41-C1BAB6F03749.jpeg

Edited by KevinRollin
Added photo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Measure once, cut twice, I always say ...

 

Or something like that anyway.  <G>

 

That's one big advantage with the earlier models - the door panels are pretty flat. My windows went in right easy.

 

Some mention of losing visibility over the stock glass - can't say as I lose that much. View's actually a lot better than I expected. I also get a small dead spot where I built out the kitchen, but I cut out the rear wall of  that and was careful to line the cutout up with the window behind it. 

 

19nov-kitchen.jpg

 

(Old pic - I've since rounded out the vertical support at the front of the cabinet. That's also got steel in it and makes for a strong hand hold for boosting myself into the van or up from the chair.

Edited by sKiZo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2020 at 6:07 PM, sKiZo said:

 

That's one big advantage with the earlier models - the door panels are pretty flat. My windows went in right easy.

 

 

Kind of apples & oranges, you need to compare the same size windows because yours are also smaller than the size KevinRollin went with. Total outside measurements on his are 25.25x16.25" for the 24x15 and I believe your windows are the 21x14 which measure 22.25x15.25" outside, using measurements from TeardropTrailerParts.com An extra inch of height doesn't sound like much, but it could be big for even a lightly curved panel.

That gap does look fairly sizable. A layer of butyl tape along the top & bottom (wrapping part way around the sides, if needed) would have helped fill out the gap and given the other sealant some extra backing, but that will be something to keep in mind for the future if you ever find a leak at the windows. Probably not a big enough deal to bother with redoing them right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went with a strip of butyl rope caulk used for sealing windshields. Stuff is a 1/2" diameter but you can stretch it down to any size you need. Press the window in place, then tighten it as much as possible without distorting the panel. Once it's in, you can just run a dull knife around the edges (plastic is good so you don't damage the paint) and peel off anything that oozed out. A rag damped with mineral spirits does a nice job of cleaning the edges so it looks pretty much factory.

 

PS ... I might have mentioned it earlier, but the windows I used were recommended by the seller after an eye's on inspection of my 2011. One advantage to living relatively close to the shop, eh. Be interesting to see their recommendations for the later model TCs ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KevinRollin said he wanted the biggest window that would fit in the door and he did it, lol. Body curvature is not something most people think of when sizing windows, though.

 

Personally, I wouldn't mind some ventilation & fresh air in back, but I don't want big windows, so I may - at some point - put in some of the 7-7/8 x 15-3/4" rectangular porthole windows (glass size 4.4x12.3", opening size 5x12.6"), in the upper-rear corners in front of the D-pillars. One thing to note is that screens are DIY on them since they're meant for boats rather than campers/vehicles. In the ad, one reviewer put a pic of his GM cargo van with the windows in the same spot I'd use.

 

I've heard that lightly-curved 'universal' windows are available, but I'd bet they cost a lot more than these flat ones y'all are using. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, jrm223 said:

A layer of butyl tape along the top & bottom (wrapping part way around the sides, if needed) would have helped fill out the gap and given the other sealant some extra backing, but that will be something to keep in mind for the future if you ever find a leak at the windows. Probably not a big enough deal to bother with redoing them right now.

The issue isn’t so much the depth out from the skin, it’s that the rubber doesn’t go to the edges of the frame.  The butyl rope as mentioned above might have helped, but I think the caulk was inevitable given the curvature.  Butyl tape would still leave seams open to water from above.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like your guys' window install posts. Those windows look great in your vans, better than the factory installed original glass that Ford removed after importing the vans from Turkey or Spain as passenger vans to get around import tariffs (what a sad waste of money and materials). you give me lots of good info for my own install.  Are you planning on insulating your vans later? and if so, what Wall Thickness Clamp Ring Size did you go with to accommodate the insulation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good question and one that hadn't occurred to me as insulation isn't that big a priority for me. Even with the cargo area open in Michigan winters, the stock heater keeps up fine. Just camping overnites and weekends, so even a smallish vented propane heater should take the edge off for the few times I'd be just sitting around.

 

Thing is, you DO need to get a good tight seal on the outer door skin, and not sure a thicker ring would do what you want. Best bet would be to contact the store and ask - I figure there's non-structural beauty rings made just for dressing the edges.

 

Be sure to post back with your results ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/11/2020 at 2:18 AM, Klaus said:

I really like your guys' window install posts. Those windows look great in your vans, better than the factory installed original glass that Ford removed after importing the vans from Turkey or Spain as passenger vans to get around import tariffs (what a sad waste of money and materials). you give me lots of good info for my own install.  Are you planning on insulating your vans later? and if so, what Wall Thickness Clamp Ring Size did you go with to accommodate the insulation?

Vintage Technologies sells many different clamp rings.  They can help you calculate the right one based on your insulation.  I just went with one that would accommodate the plastic panel, because I don’t envision insulating the upper doors.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2020 at 5:47 PM, jrm223 said:

KevinRollin said he wanted the biggest window that would fit in the door and he did it, lol. Body curvature is not something most people think of when sizing windows, though.

 

Personally, I wouldn't mind some ventilation & fresh air in back, but I don't want big windows, so I may - at some point - put in some of the 7-7/8 x 15-3/4" rectangular porthole windows (glass size 4.4x12.3", opening size 5x12.6"), in the upper-rear corners in front of the D-pillars. One thing to note is that screens are DIY on them since they're meant for boats rather than campers/vehicles. In the ad, one reviewer put a pic of his GM cargo van with the windows in the same spot I'd use.

 

I've heard that lightly-curved 'universal' windows are available, but I'd bet they cost a lot more than these flat ones y'all are using. 

 

Those don't look like they'd stay open on their own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/18/2020 at 9:33 PM, MLB said:

 

Those don't look like they'd stay open on their own.

 

And yet they do, for many people. A little friction is all that's needed; the hinges use screws & nuts, so the tension can be adjusted quickly & easily. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/11/2020 at 2:46 PM, sKiZo said:

Good question and one that hadn't occurred to me as insulation isn't that big a priority for me. Even with the cargo area open in Michigan winters, the stock heater keeps up fine. Just camping overnites and weekends, so even a smallish vented propane heater should take the edge off for the few times I'd be just sitting around.

 

Thing is, you DO need to get a good tight seal on the outer door skin, and not sure a thicker ring would do what you want. Best bet would be to contact the store and ask - I figure there's non-structural beauty rings made just for dressing the edges.

 

Be sure to post back with your results ...

I haven't taken the plunge to put windows in yet. still sitting on the fence, but rest of van conversion is almost done. no water or cooking, just a nice and cozy spot to sleep and hang out for 2. double hinged bed bottom allows for easy making of bed while still getting at the storage under the bed. separate smaller box with hinged lid toward front is part of bed but allows for some sitting flexibility. 1X2 piece of wood to support the bed on passenger side easily removes when bed is up. flip down table hides stuff and allows for a nice place to play cards or eat. I tried really hard to keep the weight down and stayed with 3/8 baltic birch plywood for most items, even thinner for over head cupboard. bed surface is 5/8 standard plywood. 

 

IMG_1600.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×