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DanDweller

Aftermarket Transmission Cooler

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Part 8 is the hose which feeds coolant from the degas bottle to the heat exchanger, where coolant dissipates heat from the ATF and flows through part 7.  

 

Part 6 and part 24 are both thermostatic type valves regulating the fluid in part 7 which is described as an outlet hose. The inference is that this flows from the heat exchanger, so the valves either stop or allow coolant flow based upon a preset temperature.  

 

ATF reaches correct temperature at cooler bypass valve, then travels to the heat exchanger.  Coolant coming from degas bottle will carry the heat down part 7, to where part 6 and part 24 valves are.  Once there is sufficient temperature, the valves allow that coolant to pass.  

 

From part 6 the heat is carried into the upper radiator hose, which feeds into the radiator for water to air cooling. Part 24 connects to part 17, which sends the heat to the heater core.  

 

This maintains the operating temperature.  The transmission temperature will not overcool.  Unless you install cooler between the bypass valve and the transmission; which bypasses the bypass valve.  A cooler inline after the heat exchanger cannot overcool.  

 

The real question is why you want an extra cooler.  You don't need it unless you are using the car in such a way that the OEM system is insufficient.  Pursuit. Racing.  Livery.  Delivery.  Towing.  All of these conditions require more cooling.  Not just the transmission.  A motor oil cooler is usually added also.  

 

If you add an extra cooler correctly, it won't hurt.  But I fail to see the benefit for most of us.  I have in my garage, an adapter plate and I can add an engine oil cooler. But it won't do any good for my Transit Connect.  It's like a spoiler.  You can tout the benefits of the spoiler.  On a Formula 1 car, it will make a huge difference.  On a Transit Connect, the spoiler won't benefit.  

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5 hours ago, Double Nickels said:

 

Part 6 and part 24 are both thermostatic type valves regulating the fluid in part 7 which is described as an outlet hose. The inference is that this flows from the heat exchanger, so the valves either stop or allow coolant flow based upon a preset temperature.   

 

 

Well, I don't really have a dog in this, um, conversation... and I've never done more than an oil change on my van, so I'm not claiming any hands-on experience... but what you are saying is not what the shop manual says.  

 

Under "Engine Cooling, System Operation", these are direct copy-paste from the manual:

 

"Transmission Fluid Heater Coolant Control Valve
The transmission fluid heater coolant control valve is an electrically controlled solenoid to allow or
block the flow of engine coolant. This electrically controllable valve is normally closed when not
energized. The valve receives a fused 12V B+ supply when the ignition is in the run or start position
and is grounded by the PCM via a low side driver. The PCM monitors the solenoid and circuits for
electrical faults and sets an appropriate DTC."


"Transmission Fluid Cooler Coolant Control Valve
The transmission fluid cooler coolant control valve is an electrically controlled solenoid to redirect
the flow of engine coolant. This electrically controllable valve is normally closed when not
energized. The valve receives a fused 12V B+ supply when the ignition is in the run or start position
and is grounded by the PCM via a low side driver. The PCM monitors the solenoid and circuits for
electrical faults and sets an appropriate DTC."

 

"The transmission cooler - warmer is mounted on the transmission. On initial startup, the transmission
fluid heater coolant control valve opens and allows warm coolant from the engine to enter the
transmission cooler - warmer to warm the transmission fluid. As the engine and transmission warm,
the transmission fluid heater coolant control valve closes and the transmission fluid cooler coolant
control valve opens, allowing cooler coolant from the radiator to enter the transmission cooler -
warmer to cool the transmission fluid."

 

Bottom line, the valves are electrically controlled by the PCM (Powertrain Control Module), and they are used to both warm and cool the trans fluid, depending on whether hot or cold coolant is sent to the heat exchanger.

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2 hours ago, Eddy Kilowatt said:

Bottom line, the valves are electrically controlled by the PCM (Powertrain Control Module), and they are used to both warm and cool the trans fluid, depending on whether hot or cold coolant is sent to the heat exchanger. 

Nice report.  The take away from my experience based on my fluid changes is that this gear box works hard and 25000 miles is about all you want the fluid to go.

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2 hours ago, Eddy Kilowatt said:

 

 

Bottom line, the valves are electrically controlled by the PCM (Powertrain Control Module), and they are used to both warm and cool the trans fluid, depending on whether hot or cold coolant is sent to the heat exchanger.

 

 

Thanks for the information.  Electronic controlled valves opened and closed by the PCM is certainly a new piece of technology.  This van is certainly a lot more sophisticated than how car's used to be built.  This is a step forward towards electronics controlling more in the cooling system.  We may see, in the cars of the future, an electronic valve, replacing the traditional mechanical, spring loaded thermostat.  Or is that already a feature on other cars?  It's good that you have access to the service manual, and that you are willing to post it.  

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21 hours ago, Fifty150 said:

Electronic controlled valves opened and closed by the PCM is certainly a new piece of technology.  This van is certainly a lot more sophisticated than how car's used to be built.  This is a step forward towards electronics controlling more in the cooling system. 

 

As I said earlier . . . adding extra trans cooling to a modern vehicle is more complicated than it was in the old days . . . . 

 

Don

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On 6/23/2019 at 10:17 PM, Fifty150 said:

 

 

You can download Forscan, and clear the adaptive learning table yourself.  It's the first option that comes up with the little wrench icon.  Don't pay that guy $140 for clicking on a mouse.  If you really want to spend the money, pay one of the guys here on this forum to come over and do it for you.

IMG_20190623_201013218.thumb.jpg.f3d1eb0cecf2506b8eea4b8db91417ba.jpg

 

Hello everybody.  Summer happened and so I forgot to give a hoot about any of this :) I did change the transmission fluid as recommended here.  It still shifts hard.  I'd like to give the adaptive codes reset a try, but to be honest, it's just beyond me.  I know someone mentioned buying a device on Amazon and then I guess I'm supposed to download this Forscan thing and plug these things into my van somewhere, but I have zero experience with this kind of thing and would be buying something I'll use once.  The local tranny shops want $140-$175, which is absurd given that it might not even fix the problem. 

So I'm reaching out to see if anyone here lives in Utah and would be willing to do it for me for whatever pay you think is fair.  At the least, I'd buy you a six pack :)

 

 

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You may be able to find a Focus or Fiesta enthusiast in your area that has used Forscan and will help you.

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Alright.  Roll call.  Anybody in Utah to help DanDweller?

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