Jump to content
  • Custom Search


LESD

2015 TC transmission fluid change

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Double Nickels said:

I hear that modern engines, transmissions, and fluids are designed for higher temps. 

 

Fully synthetic oils take a lot more heat and beating before the bonds start breaking down. More than the engine can produce in normal operating mode, excluding racing etc. The carrier fluid is still regular oil and can be burnt to crisp easier but the synthetic bonds that guarantee the uniform lubricating film withstand a lot.

Edited by mrtn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

7 hours ago, Double Nickels said:

I will drain and fill 3 times on mine.

That is the way i did mine 3 times at 25000 intervals.  I did a post on the procedure with pictures , look it  up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GBL, thanks again for your write up.  It's perfect.  Great photos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Double Nickels said:

Has anyone figured out where to disconnect the transmission line for a DIY driveway flush?

Good question..i'm due. I wonder if the cooler lines would work.Drain and fill several times to labor intensive for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone with a workshop manual may have the answer. 

 

Transmissions all route the ATF through the cooling system, then sometimes through an auxiliary cooler if there is 1, and returns to the transmission.  Now all that is left is to identify which one of the hoses under the hood is the return line to the transmission, and figure out where & how to disconnect it. 

 

With the Ford trucks, which have a lot more space under the hood, hot fluid went into the radiator at the top of the radiator and came out the bottom.  Same exact design for decades.  Very easy to disconnect and attach a long piece of transmission line with a hose clamp, then run fluid into a bucket for collection.  Old Hondas were easy also.  Disconnect the the transmission line, attach your own transmission line with a hose clamp, the other end empties into a bucket.  

 

When I look under the hood of the transit connect, there are hoses everywhere.  I'm not sure which hose to disconnect,  or how to do it (if special tools are needed).

 

In a service bay, with a lift, the techs disconnect the cooling line at the back of the transmission.  Cooling line goes to a cooler bypass valve, which allows fluid to continuously flow back into the transmission while it is cold, and flow to the cooling system when hot.  That's not as easy to get to when you have the car on jack stands, and you're crawling under it.  The line from the transmission case, is the cooling line.  The line returning cool fluid should be at the front, so that fluid goes back to the sump.   In the Transit Connect, the battery, fuse box, and air box completely blocks you from being able to access those lines, or even see them.  So now you look down towards the radiator, and you are sure that the largest hoses must be engine cooling.  But what about all the other connections, and where do they go?  Which direction is the flow?

 

It was a very easy, with the car on jackstands, to do the triple drain & fill.  Since there is a drain plug, and you can easily fill through the vent assembly.  I'm still hoping that someone will figure out which hose to connect, how to do it, and write up a step by step for us.

 

 

6f35 cooler.jpg

6f35 reman.jpg

6f35drain.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought 6 gallons of Mercon LV from Rock Auto.  I'm lucky it didn't damage enroute.  Plastic wrap on the box, and the shipping label.  No padding.  No protection.  What a bargain.  About the same price for 24 quarts, as the price for 12 quarts.  

 

 

IMG_20190620_175238786.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just went through this for my first time.  I’ve replaced the fluid three times and on my third, I did not start the engine and go through the gears .  I filled until fluid came out the side port.  Do I need to put it in N, run through the gears, let get to temperature, then when the motor is still running, pull the side plug and check the level?  I believe this is what I need to do.  Thanks in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fill check plug on the side is used when ATF is at 85 - 93 C.

 

You will need some sort of scan tool or app to read the ATF temperature via the OBDII port.  A popular setup is HS/MS Can OBDII dongle, via USB, to a laptop with FORScan.  You can forget about trying to use a point & shoot thermometer, as you will get a lot of different readings, and none will be accurate to what the car's computer sees from the sensor in the transmission valve body.  

235022856_foreskindisplay.thumb.jpg.fef3adc8a0c6b85798fa2df54cc576bd.jpg

550638663_foreskindisplay1.jpg.7d2590daf4657421836ab1230a2235b4.jpg

 

 

At the correct operating temperature, your ATF has closed the cooler bypass valve, is flowing in a complete loop through the cooling system, and has expanded.  This is the correct fill level for the fill check plug.  From what you have described, your ATF was not at the correct temperature when you opened the fill check plug.  This will result in an overfill condition.  

 

Not entirely catastrophic.  Excess hot & expanded ATF will probably purge from the vent cap.  But the best idea is to now adjust the fluid level to where it is correct.  

 

Between you, me, the tree, and nobody else - I think that transmission engineers design automatic transmissions with a certain level of "oops factor".  They know that some people will make a little mistake with underfill & overfill, or what if there is a fluid leak causing some fluid to be lost?  Everyone will tell you that you should have the correct fluid level, and I agree with that.  But you're probably safe by a quart within the correct fill level.  Meaning 1/2 quart low or high would still be safe.  Not ideal.  But safe.  After all, why is there a hashmark range on dipsticks?  Otherwise, the dipstick would just have one line, or hole, and you better be at that exact level.

 

The factory fill on this 6F35, as published in earlier versions of owners manuals, is 4 liters.  Not 4 quarts.  4 liters.  Fill with 4 liters.  Drive until transmission fluid temperature is 185 - 200 F.  Then open the fill check plug.  If nothing comes out, then add fluid.  If fluid is coming out, wait until nothing is coming out.  Now reinstall the plug.  

 

I'm lazy,.  My 3rd fill is 4 liters.  I'm done.  I add 4 liters of Mercon LV, and then drive it until the next transmission service.  It's not right.  It's just what I do.

 

Don't consider anything I write to be advice or recommended.  You do what you want to do.  It won't be my fault when something goes wrong.  You won't be able to say, "5150 told me to....."

 

 

Edited by Fifty150

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI Valvoline MaxLife ATF is now available in a 5 gallon box.

 

330613823_valvatf.jpg.527828b608d391aa06ae9a5362c65711.jpg

Edited by Fifty150

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you very much.  Funny thing is, about a cup of fluid came out and I have only added about 3.8 l of fluid.  I looked at my obdii tool and it only provides codes and the ability to clear them.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, kookmyers said:

I just went through this for my first time.  I’ve replaced the fluid three times and on my third, I did not start the engine and go through the gears .  I filled until fluid came out the side port.  Do I need to put it in N, run through the gears, let get to temperature, then when the motor is still running, pull the side plug and check the level?  I believe this is what I need to do.  Thanks in advance.

Yes  -  With the van level and up to operating temperature, you pull the plug with the engine running (if you pull it with the engine NOT running, fluid will run out) and then you slowly add fluid until you see it just start to run out the hole and then put the plug back in

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/17/2018 at 7:51 AM, LESD said:

I have 2105 TC and the transmission fluid needs to be changed. I can't find any videos or info on how to do this at home. I can find info for the 2014 but where they say the oil level plug is, mine isn't there. Can someone shed some light on this please?

Do you have the 2.5L and what did you find out? I need to do my 2014 2.5L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/27/2019 at 7:27 AM, Beta Don said:

Yes  -  With the van level and up to operating temperature, you pull the plug with the engine running (if you pull it with the engine NOT running, fluid will run out) and then you slowly add fluid until you see it just start to run out the hole and then put the plug back in

 

Don

Is this procedure for the 2.5L? no one ever specifies what engine size this is for 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×