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williaty

How the heck do you jack one of these things up?

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On 10/12/2017 at 8:44 AM, Beta Don said:

 

 

I guess if I ran an auto service shop where they would get used everyday, they might make sense, even at that price, but for the average guy who *might* use them once a year . . . . . ??

 

 

 

I suspect that an automotive service shop would not buy such a gimmicky device.  All of these devices are designed around not having a lift.  An automotive service shop would have a lift.  And apparently, some people who have the luxury of space available, also have a lift.  

 

I also balked at the $300 price tag.  But then again, in hindsight, I am wincing at how much I paid for 6 AllTrade PowerBuilt All-In-One UniJacks.  I originally bought one.  Liked it a lot.  Then decided that I should have 4 for my truck.  Now I have 2 more for the van.  

 

I don't even want to think about the small fortune I have thrown away into my hobbies over the years.  Cars.  Motorcycles.  Tools.  Sports. Guns.  Drinking.  Girls.  Knives.  Barry Manilow 8 track cassettes.   Dining.  Hunting.  Fishing.  Following Barry Manilow on tour.  Electronics.  Atari 2600.  Polyester leisure suits.  Permed hair.  Gold chains.  

 

In today's dollars, with the median salary of $52,000 annually; I will waste over $1,000,000 in my lifetime.  Tang rots your brains.  

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By now, we've all seen the video clip with Jay Leno promoting JackPoint Jack Stands.

 

 

 

These were designed with small cars in mind.  Low to the ground.  Tight suspension.  This will not be a "one size fits all" for every vehicle.  

 

With a 2 ton bottle jack, I raised the Transit Connect to 12".  @ 1' of lift at the front jack point, the front tire was still on the ground.  Definitely a statistic to be mindful of when selecting lifting equipment for Transit Connect.  It could be interesting to see how these work on a Transit Connect.

 

Jackpoint Jackstands are 13 inches high (12.25 inches with the low profile pad), 16 inches wide, and 12 inches deep overall. 

 

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I don't need no $300 jack stands.

stolenwheels.jpg

Used by successful "wheel recyclers" for decades !!!

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At least they were kind enough to put it on blocks instead of just dropping it to the ground ...

 

** Wonder if the guvmint is ever gonna require RFID tracking on cement blocks like they do with explosives and such? Of course, that would just make stealing concrete blocks that much more attractive to the shady crews doing this sort of thing.

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Milk crates are surprisingly strong also.

 

Related imageImage result for car on milk cratesImage result for car on milk crates

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Great until you need to remove a tire.  No tire changes, tire rotations, suspension work, or even just to remove the tire so that you can pull back the wheel well to change a light bulb.

http://myliftstand.com/ 

 

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At least this gimmick is safer than guys stacking wood blocks on their jacks.

 

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Edited by Fifty150

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On 7/11/2018 at 11:39 PM, Fifty150 said:

 

 

AllTrade PowerBuilt All-In-One UniJacks.  I originally bought one.  Liked it a lot.  Then decided that I should have 4 for my truck.  Now I have 2 more for the van.  

 

 

 

 

The collection is now at 8.  4 for the truck.  4 for the van.  I actually drive around with them.  

 

KIMG2133.thumb.JPG.99004326dbd0fe7860380ff5063ba873.JPGKIMG2100.thumb.JPG.e7c698911198c274e6b12e007e0de2f0.JPGKIMG2071.thumb.JPG.d4bd8f9c7fdf38edff9aac4924edb816.JPGKIMG2135.thumb.JPG.3334f09985924bd6b0c4e8f102d9a68b.JPG

 

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Here is what they look like, with the Transit Connect.  All tires are off the ground by about 2". Just enough room for my fat belly and butt to crawl under. Plenty of room to go even higher.

IMG_20190429_163156935.thumb.jpg.f6144ff8be99bd8075ccb15de61e5c59.jpg

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On 7/12/2018 at 2:39 AM, Fifty150 said:

 

 

I suspect that an automotive service shop would not buy such a gimmicky device.  All of these devices are designed around not having a lift.  An automotive service shop would have a lift.  And apparently, some people who have the luxury of space available, also have a lift.  

 

I also balked at the $300 price tag.  But then again, in hindsight, I am wincing at how much I paid for 6 AllTrade PowerBuilt All-In-One UniJacks.  I originally bought one.  Liked it a lot.  Then decided that I should have 4 for my truck.  Now I have 2 more for the van.  

 

I don't even want to think about the small fortune I have thrown away into my hobbies over the years.  Cars.  Motorcycles.  Tools.  Sports. Guns.  Drinking.  Girls.  Knives.  Barry Manilow 8 track cassettes.   Dining.  Hunting.  Fishing.  Following Barry Manilow on tour.  Electronics.  Atari 2600.  Polyester leisure suits.  Permed hair.  Gold chains.  

 

In today's dollars, with the median salary of $52,000 annually; I will waste over $1,000,000 in my lifetime.  Tang rots your brains.  

 

 

Wait a minute ......you actually followed Barry Manilow around..... like a groupie ?  Never mind not important , nice jack stands by the way .

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12 hours ago, herb said:

 

 

......you actually followed Barry Manilow around..... like a groupie ? 

 

The 70's was a turbulent decade.  

 

 

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I'd like to revisit this topic if some folks on here want to chip in! I have been thinking about this a bit because I need to get under the car and figure out why I have vibration under acceleration above ~65 mph. (It sounds like it should be a worn out bearing or other connection going into the transmission)

 

Yesterday I tried to jack the van up to get it on jack stands using a few different methods with my hydraulic jack and traditional jack stands. 

 

1. Lifting from the pinch weld using the hyrdraulic jack. This leaves you no good spot to place the jack stand at or near the pinch weld. Didn't feel confident I could get good placement on the lower control arm.

 

2. Lifting from the steel channel that is bolted to the frame just inboard of the pinch weld. This, also didn't leave me enough room to get a jack stand under the pinch weld. Not sure this is an appropriate jacking point, but it seemed to work; anyone have insight?

 

3. Lifting from the lower control arm using the hydraulic jack. This did work to get one jack stand under the van on the pinch weld! But when I tried to lift the other side using the lower control arm, the car started to shift and eventually looked like it might tip the jack stand on the opposite side. Definitely didn't feel like it would be safe to crawl under the van.

 

After this I went inside and started to look at these combo bottle jack jack-stands. Looks like it might be a decent solution, but I'm not ready to say it's the only option!

 

Revisiting method 2 above: Does anyone think it would make sense to use the hydraulic jack to lift from the pinch weld and then use jack stands to support the van by putting them under that steel channel that runs just inboard? Originally I didn't want to leave the weight there because I wasn't sure it was strong enough to lift the van. However, it seems to have done the job without complaint, so it may be the way to go. 

 

If no to that method... then I assume these stands are my best-bet? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00GJJZ5YC?pf_rd_p=76bd99fd-409f-46a4-9ff6-b66b5703e95b&pf_rd_r=2AZEBYE796CZ5GA3B6SS

There are 3 ton jacks for a bit cheaper, but I think they're too tall to fit under the weld. (https://www.amazon.com/Alltrade-640912-Black-All-Bottle/dp/B003ULZGFU/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=all+in+one+bottle+jack&qid=1557762210&s=automotive&sr=1-1)

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I have been lucky and never had to use floor jacks and jack stands on ours so I can not give much help on this. But one thing I can help with is this, If you do not feel safe doing it then it is not safe. It's that simple. 

 

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The pinch weld runs the entire length of the van from tire to tire.  Lifting anywhere along the pinch weld is safe.   I lift with a small floor jack, just a few inches, so that I can slide the UniJack under the pinch weld.  Once I have a UniJack in front of each rear tire, and behind each front tire, right about where the "factory lift point" markings are, then I take my time raising the UniJacks to the height I want.  

 

I have the 3 ton model.  You could probably use the 2 ton model.  Just remember that these will not simply slide under your van, because the Transit Connect is so low to the ground.  You will still need to start the lifting with a floor jack.  Or maybe even use that scissor jack that came with your van.  

 

I already have photos posted on this thread.  Just scroll up.  

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10 hours ago, Fifty150 said:

The pinch weld runs the entire length of the van from tire to tire.  Lifting anywhere along the pinch weld is safe.

 

Actually, that's not true.  There are reinforced places in the pinch weld where it is triple thick and those are the only safe jack points.  Jacking where it's just the two thicknesses welded together could crush the rocker panel

 

If you keep the jack within about 6 inches behind the front wheel and 6 inches in front of the rear wheel, you're pretty safe, but the bet practice is to double check to make sure you're jacking at the reinforced spots where there are 3 pieces of metal welded up and not just two

 

Don

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3 hours ago, Beta Don said:

 

There are reinforced places in the pinch weld where it is triple thick

 

 

Excellent point.  

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On 5/14/2019 at 5:29 AM, Fifty150 said:

The pinch weld runs the entire length of the van from tire to tire.  Lifting anywhere along the pinch weld is safe.   I lift with a small floor jack, just a few inches, so that I can slide the UniJack under the pinch weld. 

Someone else mentioned it as well, but I have learned this is a poor assumption. I have seen an Audi pinch weld crumple under jacking loads because it was not exactly the right spot and interface. 

 

That said, if you’ve tested it and it works, I won’t argue. Just wasn’t ready to risk my frame. I did feel around and it seems like the jack point is in fact reinforced, but only just. Didn’t feel like mathing to figure out if the other areas could handle the load.

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On 5/13/2019 at 11:44 AM, tp_connectic said:

2. Lifting from the steel channel that is bolted to the frame just inboard of the pinch weld. This, also didn't leave me enough room to get a jack stand under the pinch weld. Not sure this is an appropriate jacking point, but it seemed to work; anyone have insight?

 

...

 

Revisiting method 2 above: Does anyone think it would make sense to use the hydraulic jack to lift from the pinch weld and then use jack stands to support the van by putting them under that steel channel that runs just inboard? Originally I didn't want to leave the weight there because I wasn't sure it was strong enough to lift the van. However, it seems to have done the job without complaint, so it may be the way to go. 

...

Coming back with conclusions; I used the modified method 2 above and jacked via the pinch weld then place jack stands on the steel U-channel running across the body and terminating just inboard of the pinch weld. The steel channel certainly could handle the load and I did not see any evidence of damage to the body of the car.

 

I would deem this an acceptable jacking method, the wheels were just off the ground without much trouble and the van was stable enough that I felt confident crawling under.

 

appreciate the input from folks!

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It helps to have a jack capable of lifting higher and jack stands able to support the car at a higher height.  Nothing like a jack only getting up to 14", then lowering back on jack stands about 11" or 12".  A foot off the ground is just not enough space to crawl under a car and work comfortably.  

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On 5/14/2019 at 4:32 PM, Beta Don said:

 

Actually, that's not true.  There are reinforced places in the pinch weld where it is triple thick and those are the only safe jack points.  Jacking where it's just the two thicknesses welded together could crush the rocker panel

 

If you keep the jack within about 6 inches behind the front wheel and 6 inches in front of the rear wheel, you're pretty safe, but the bet practice is to double check to make sure you're jacking at the reinforced spots where there are 3 pieces of metal welded up and not just two

 

Don

 

 

Sounds like it's impossible to see where the triple thick jacking point is so i guess you just have to feel for it with your hands .   So you think as long as you maintain the 6 inch distance behind the front wheel and 6 inch distance in front of the rear wheel you will be OK ?

 

Thank you

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There is a arrow in the plastic moulding along the bottom on my TC the shows the jack points.

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A good floor jack used under the front control arm and the Rear spring perch will let the  TC be jacked up high enough to put a jack stand under the reinforced pinch weld area. Harbor freight has a nice aluminium jack for around  70.00. 

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I hear Harbor Freight jacks are better now.

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