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desert_connect

2017 TC XLT simple camper

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On 7/23/2018 at 1:57 PM, desert_connect said:

I finally got around to painting the cheap moisture wicking door panels. I did the rear door first and will do the sliding doors next. Scuffed the panels with 150# sandpaper. Painted a primer and a base coat on both sides and a granite top coat on the face only. The rough finish looks good but may prove to be a nuisance to clean.   

 

 

Nice job painting those panels. That came out really nice. I did mine recently and also considered doing a textured finish but choose semi-gloss paint instead for ease of cleanup. I only finished the front surface and edges, not the back. Probably will go back and do the back if I see moisture getting picked up there.

 

I also sanded the surface first with 150 grit and then rolled on BIN primer (water based) like you did  and sprayed just the fronts using the same 2X paint. The small rear panels came out okay, but the larger slider panels looked crappy. It's hard to spray a non-flat finish and getting a consistent finish over a large area. I ended up rolling on semi-gloss paint instead using a sponge roller. Came out much better with a more consistent finish. I'll pass along that this Rust-oleum painter's touch paint is crap.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Painter-s-Touch-32-oz-Ultra-Cover-Semi-Gloss-Black-General-Purpose-Paint-1974502/100208855

I bought it at a local hardware store and when I got home read the reviews at Home Depot, which were terrible. I figured the negative reviews were all by hacks and used the paint anyway. They were right and I was sorry I didn't heed the warning. The paint works better with a brush but with a roller it pulls up and bubbles leaving a pitted surface. Not good. I'll leave it for now but down the road will refinish it using a better quality enamel paint.

 

 

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On 8/8/2018 at 5:58 PM, windguy said:

Nice job painting those panels. That came out really nice. I did mine recently and also considered doing a textured finish but choose semi-gloss paint instead for ease of cleanup. I only finished the front surface and edges, not the back. Probably will go back and do the back if I see moisture getting picked up there.

 

Thanks windguy and GBL.

Your panels look great, windguy. I too had a real challenge painting the large side door panels with temps well above 100* I could not paint fast enough.....lol. My side door panels are not quite as nice as the smaller rear panels but look okay. I painted the insides because I leave the doors cracked while camping and at times when it rains they do get a few drips and dribbles.  

 

After putting the panels back on I discovered right away they rattled. The panels too rigid with paint (?). So, I pulled them back off and covered the inside(s) with a foam membrane using a left over roll of that thin foam for the floating laminate flooring. That tightened the panels up and worked well. May have even made the inside a bit quieter too.    

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Nice job with your conversion. I probably can even get my bike in with the fold up capabilities you made here. I built a Dodge MaxiVan made especially for versatility back in 1974. Camping, motorcycle hauling and of course easily removeable components for hauling large objects, lumber, yardwork etc. 

Can your modifications be quickly and easly removed as well?. I want the capability to take my Lawn tractor for "Rides" in the Van Transit Connect as well. 

DRZinTransit Cl.jpg

DRZinTransit.jpg

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On 8/12/2018 at 7:03 AM, HeRodeCBR said:

Nice job with your conversion. I probably can even get my bike in with the fold up capabilities you made here. I built a Dodge MaxiVan made especially for versatility back in 1974. Camping, motorcycle hauling and of course easily removeable components for hauling large objects, lumber, yardwork etc. 

Can your modifications be quickly and easly removed as well?. I want the capability to take my Lawn tractor for "Rides" in the Van Transit Connect as well. 

 

Thanks, HeRodeCBR!

 

I would suspect that a bike could be loaded along side my camper bed/sofa with the foot pegs folded up. It takes up exactly half of the van, so 24" open between the wheel wells and around 25" above. There are only two turnbuckles holding the unit in place so I can remove it myself in only a couple of minutes. 

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On 8/11/2018 at 2:02 PM, desert_connect said:

 

Thanks windguy and GBL.

Your panels look great, windguy. I too had a real challenge painting the large side door panels with temps well above 100* I could not paint fast enough.....lol. My side door panels are not quite as nice as the smaller rear panels but look okay. I painted the insides because I leave the doors cracked while camping and at times when it rains they do get a few drips and dribbles.  

 

After putting the panels back on I discovered right away they rattled. The panels too rigid with paint (?). So, I pulled them back off and covered the inside(s) with a foam membrane using a left over roll of that thin foam for the floating laminate flooring. That tightened the panels up and worked well. May have even made the inside a bit quieter too.    

 

Thanks desert_connect.

Interesting about those panels being a noise source when painted. I can see that happening. Underneath them is some material that you'd think would buffer any resonance. I sound proofed all the doors and I think it's helped out a lot. Something to consider down the road.

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17 hours ago, windguy said:

 

Thanks desert_connect.

Interesting about those panels being a noise source when painted. I can see that happening. Underneath them is some material that you'd think would buffer any resonance. I sound proofed all the doors and I think it's helped out a lot. Something to consider down the road.

 

I also put a dynamat type material in all my doors for sound deadening and it sure got rid of the tinny sound. My side doors have a foam covering the cut out openings underneath the panels, however the foam does not touch the side panel rivet fastener area where I was getting the vibration rattle. My rear doors did not have the factory foam, only a plastic film under three openings and nothing under the forth.   

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1 hour ago, desert_connect said:

 

I also put a dynamat type material in all my doors for sound deadening and it sure got rid of the tinny sound. My side doors have a foam covering the cut out openings underneath the panels, however the foam does not touch the side panel rivet fastener area where I was getting the vibration rattle. My rear doors did not have the factory foam, only a plastic film under three openings and nothing under the forth.   

 

Your van is the same as mine. The sliders have this white thin foam covering, as pictured below, and the back doors a plastic film only on 3 doors. I ended up making a covering out of a thin plastic cutting board and using contact cement to hold it in place. Probably not as water tight as the other 3 covers but good enough.

 

I think you might be on to something with the slider panels being a noise source and I like the idea of adding a buffer to the inside face. After doing the sound deadening, I tried to add plastic bags of wall insulation but ended up removing it as I didn't like how it bowed out the foam covering when it expanded. I couldn't get it to fit like I wanted it to so abandoned that idea. But if I tap around the slider panel it sure does have a rattling noise that increases away from the edges. I hear this type of noise when driving on rough pavement and it sounds like a low level popcorn machine going off. Hard to describe. Hard to determine the source of the noise when you're driving but it could be those slider panels. I should remove them and see if the noise abates. The one advantage of sound proofing the van is it lets you pinpoint sources of road noise easier because the overall noise level of the van has been reduced. I'll add that to my van todo list for when the weather cools down.

 

 

slider door open.JPG

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Finally getting around to doing more interior work on my TC. I started by adding thin (Lowes) carpet to the sheet metal windows. The rear doors (pics) were easy being able to oversize the carpet to tuck neatly underneath the door frame and used 1" magnetic strips to hold them up. I cut out the rear side windows but still working out the mounting details.

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Interesting.  You're using magnets.  This is not intended to be permanent?  It looks good.

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I added another LED light. This one is movable by using magnets for mounting at windguy's suggection, both lights live 12v van power. I can reach this light from the driver and pass seat, side door or from in the back. These computerized vehicles are very aggravating some lights are on when you don't want them and others you can't turn on when you do want them! 

 

I also bought a Caframo Bora 12v marine fan, mounted with magnets and hooked it up to a Webtop 155 wh LED batt/generator. It will run on low for 100 hrs or on high for 50 hrs w/o any worries of depleting the van battery. This fan combined combined with front door window vent shades does add some much needed air movement inside for sleeping. We camped last weekend in the Tombstone Bisbee area. 

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On 5/16/2019 at 6:43 PM, Fifty150 said:

Interesting.  You're using magnets.  This is not intended to be permanent?  It looks good.

Thanks. I used the magnets because I am not 100% sure this is what want and this allows me to backtrack.

 

Oops, looks like I should have proof read my fan post! 

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Posted (edited)

I purchased and installed an AMA passenger sliding door window with an opening sliding window, 17% privacy glass. 

 

The installation was not terribly difficult but not easy either. I sharpened the end of a hacksaw blade and cut my way through the urethane caulking on the front side of the plastic panel. Then pulled a .030" ss wire on through using the hole in the end of the blade and wrapped it around the outside of the plastic panel. Tied off the bottom outside wire and with a wooden handle started pulling from the inside to cut the urethane across the top. Top and bottom were easy only having one bead of caulking but struggled with both ends and had to cut most of the outer bead with the blade before the wire would go through. I did not know it then but there are two line up dowels one in each upper corner. Panel off I trimmed the excess urethane off the door using a wood chisel. Then added a vinyl channel trim around the pinch weld. After priming the caulking area on the door and cleaning the glass ! proceeded with a new bead of urethane and this is the second difficult part. I had already anticipated this part and even with warming up the caulking it was quite a struggle to get all around the window let alone a nice V bead. A powered caulking gun would make this much easier and it is almost a necessity. My arm feels like it is 3" longer now! With the caulking done I set the glass in place and bedded it into the caulking. Taped the top to keep it from sagging and wait for it to cure.   

     

 

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Edited by desert_connect

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Great tutorial.  Excellent photos.

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