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Ford recommends Motorcraft synthetic blend.  The controversy is that nobody regulates what percentage of your quart of oil has to be synthetic, in order for it to be called synthetic blend.  Maybe someone knowledgeable can speak up and inform us as to how much synthetic is in the blend.  

 

In the past, I've tried different oils.  All the boutique brands and large brands have found their way into my engines.  Amsoil, Royal Purple, Lucas Oil, Eneos, Schaeffer, Mobil 1, Pennzoil, Valvoline, Mag 1, Castrol, Red Line, et cetera.  I've tried all the overpriced filters.  Did I notice a difference?  No.  Reason being that none of my cars were highly modified.  An intake, an exhaust system, an underdrive pulley, and custom tuning does nothing that demands any sort of high grade oil & filter.  High price oil & filter have never given me any added power, torque, speed, or mileage.  I know that I will never need to wire tie a K&N on my Transit Connect: because there is no way that the filter will blow under load.

 

Can it be argued that the benefits are not immediate and seen with the naked eye?  Is it a scientifically proven fact that your engine will last longer if you use a synthetic oil and better filter?

 

I know that I don't want to find out the results of using the lowest price conventional oil, with a discount filter.    And the mere fact that everyone here is a vehicle owner who is savvy enough to read about and contribute to an oil change discussion tells me none of you are getting the coupon oil change at the local discount lube shop.  And I doubt if anyone will testify that they've gone over a million miles with Wal*Mart  oil & filter.  

 

I've never used a Wal*Mart filter.  Or for that matter, a Fram, Champion, Bosch, Purolator, Wix, HiFloFilTro, or Baldwin.  I've always tried to stay with the OEM, or K&N.  Since I've only seen online videos of filters being cut, I don't have first hand knowledge of the effectiveness of flow rate, filtration, et cetera.  

 

I am just wondering if Castrol's Magnatec is all hokum; with claims that their special magic ju-ju sticks to the inside of the engine to protect the metal, even as oil has returned to the oil pan.

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16 hours ago, Mike Chell said:

 

 

 

My experience ... they DON'T over torque them.  They don't USE a torque wrench at all.

WAY too many mechanics think their wrists are calibrated.   

for those of you who're thinking, "mine is" ... no, it's NOT.

 

 

 

 

Filters are suppose to be hand tightened.  But whose hand?  We all have different hands.  

 

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Filters are NOT supposed to be "hand tight".  That's the generic claim.  Look in any manual, and you'll see an actual torque spec or tightening angle.  The most recent one I've seen is for Honda outboards.

Without a filter wrench, run the filter down 'til the o-ring touches, then turn it 7/8 of a turn.   

If you have a filter socket, run it down 'til it touches and torque to 13 ft/lbs.

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13 foot pounds for a Honda outboard? Ford Transit Connect? Or both?

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Just the Honda spec.  I haven't looked at Fords specs, yet.

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6 hours ago, Mike Chell said:

Just the Honda spec.  

 

 

As I recall, since I have owned Hondas and have friends who work at Honda dealerships, Snap-On used to sell a Honda specific oil filter torque wrench which was preset to whatever Honda's torque spec was.  Apparently, at that time, all the Honda engines used the same filter.  And even then, there was talk of upgrading the filters to a larger size by way of relocating the filter.  The argument being that with a 6 cylinder engine using the same filtration as a 4 cylinder, you are asking for trouble.  But I pointed out that in most of those Accords, minivans, and quasi SUV/pickup trucks, they also used the same transmission and braking.  A couple of the Honda car club guys threatened to take the stickers off my Honda.

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Looking back, I don't think any aftermarket company developed a filter relocation kit like the kind that you see for muscle cars.  

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Posted (edited)

As I looked up the current 2018 Owners Manual, I see that Ford now recommends 0W-20 as an alternative weight oil.  Anyone try that yet?5b0f7463e3dd3_alternativeoil.thumb.jpg.69f881ef8277fe3ed7d9c5d28ce7eb88.jpg

Edited by Fifty150

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And while I'm looking at this stuff online, has anyone ever bought bulk oil?  I see a 5 gallon bucket on Amazon for $42.87.  That's about $2.15 per quart.  

 

4.5 quarts in the Honda.  5.7 qts in the Transit Connect.  6 qts in the pickup truck.  That still leaves me with a little less than a gallon.  The numbers don't work in my favor, even if I spill a little oil in the driveway.  

 

 
  • Milesyn SB 5W20 API GF-5/SN Synthetic Blend Motor Oil 5 Gallon Pail
Click image to open expanded view
    
 
 

Milesyn SB 5W20 API GF-5/SN Synthetic Blend Motor Oil 5 Gallon Pail

 
 
Price: $42.87 Free Shipping for Prime Members

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On 5/29/2018 at 1:12 PM, PhotoAl said:

 

contemplating Castro. Vs Mobile 1.

 

 

Pricing and availability.  I have always gone with the better price.  Of course you want to use a higher grade oil.  Ford uses Synthetic Blend.  Good idea to use a Synthetic Blend or Full Synthetic.  I wouldn't save a couple of dollars by using conventional "dinosaur juice".

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All modern cars have been running fully synthetic since the nineties. I bought my first new car in 1996 (Escort) and it was filled with 0W-20 from the factory. 

 

Was at Ford dealer yesterday (this is a completely different topic) and there was a poster on the wall:

 

large.5b1b833ee8142_2018-06-0808_35_55.jpg.1316f016459e1608683e1ad3678b1f0c.jpg

 

It says Castrol and Ford working together for 100 years. Which may confirm my suspicion of Castrol being the OEM for Motorcraft branded oil.

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I've always used full synthetic.  Not particularly a fan of synthetic blends.  IMO the advantage of synthetic oil is it's ability to withstand higher temperatures without breaking down.  If you haven't been to the site Bob is the Oil Guy or something like that, there is some very interesting reading and lots of technical information and many opinions.  The higher the temperature in the engine the better the efficiency so manufactures have tended to run them hotter which is harder on the oil.  Add in turbochargers and it is even more challenging but well understood by most manufactures.  In general the todays engines are remarkable trouble free.  

 

In the high performance motorcycle communities it gets very interesting.  Seems like for every 10 people there are at least 15 opinions on oil or so it seems.  In my motorcycle I have run lots of different oils ranging from "basic" Mobile 1 synthetic to Red Line synthetic to Motul synthetic.  Currently running Castrol synthetic motorcycle racing oil and it's still running. Was playing a bit yesterday and shifted a few time at about 15,000RPM with no problems (redline is 16,000 RPM).

 

However I currently have a VW 2.0 TSI turbo apart in the garage because of metal in the oil pan!!!!  75,000 miles and the timing chain tensioner failed!  Looks like I'll get by with a new tensioner and oil pump.  This is the 2nd VW turbo motor I've had catastrophically fail even though using good oil and regularly changing.  The older VW turbo's were brutal on the oil and even fully synthetic Mobile 1 would sludge!  Have to run the VW spec oil and then are lucky if it doesn't have an internal mechanical failure.

 

All that to say on my TC about to change oil for the first time at 5,000 miles.  Don't have a indicator up but don't want to go too long.  I'll put full synthetic Castrol 5-20 in it.  IMO these are well designed engines which are not hard on the engine oil and should last a very long time with regular oil changes.  When the engine is cold I always let it warm a bit before driving off and am always gently with the acceleration until its warmed up.  

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The real key is using an approved oil and keeping it clean.  Now that most engines have long timing chains running over plastic chain guides and hydraulically run cam timing ,  the oil change  has become even more important.  Direct injection has also raised the bar as the oil vapor from the crankcase is an issue for the intake valves.

One more point  is every oil filter regardless of price or quality has a by pass valve  that protects the filter.  This means unfiltered oil circulates through the engine lots of the time, so keeping the oil clean is even more important.

  

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GBL,

 

Which filters do you like?

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Just a note on oil and filters.  What I type here is based on oil and filter manufacturer representatives who've visited our school.

1)  There is NO manufacturer making filters, or refining oils, that are making "substandard" products.  They MUST be, at least, standard. 

2)  This means that, if you're doing your oil changes on or before the scheduled intervals, even the cheapest oil and filter will be sufficient.  You can argue against this, but it's the truth.

3)  NO company is going to leave itself open to lawsuits intentionally.  No company is going to produce products that guarantee failures even if used correctly.

4)  If your vehicle requires a specific oil, then cheaper oils may not work.  But if your vehicle requires SAE/API automotive grade oils, then ANY oil with that specification on the bottle MUST meet minimum requirements and are sufficient.

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12 hours ago, Mike Chell said:

 

 

1)  There is NO manufacturer making filters, or refining oils, that are making "substandard" products.  They MUST be, at least, standard. 

 

 

 

Not in the conventional auto parts store, dealership, or reputable retailer level.

 

Imagine something produced in a 3rd world country, then dumped into the global marketplace via unsuspecting importers, wholesalers, and distributors.  If you could bottle sludge in Yemen, then bottle it with a counterfeit label, and make $1.......billions of dollars can be made with a ship full of shipping containers.  

 

You don't have to try too hard.  But when you find yourself at swap meets, discount $0.99 stores in Chinatown, or some weird guy selling stuff out of the back of an old van parked curbside......well, let's just say that I have seen "motor oil" without any of the API, SAE markings.  I've seen "motor oil" labeled in foreign languages.  I've seen "Castro" and "Mobile 1" brand, not "Castrol" or "Mobil 1".  I've seen a lot of knock-off items over the years.  Everything from high end goods that you would expect, like luxury brands, to things you would never believe that anyone would counterfeit.  Soy sauce.  Ice tea mix.  "WiWi"brand shoe polish as opposed to "Kiwi".  How many "K" spells Kikkoman?  Kikoman?  Or Kikkoman?  Is it Crystal Light ice tea, or Crystal Lite ice tea?

 

Sad that it's here in the USA, with almost no enforcement.  I, for one, could care less that some rich girl bought a fake handbag.  But what happens when someone in a poor neighborhood consumes a counterfeit food product?  How about infant formula mix with melamine?  And in a lot of cases, when items like that are intercepted and seized, it is not on the front page of the newspaper.  

 

 

 

 

 

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On 5/29/2018 at 12:57 AM, Fifty150 said:
  On 6/16/2017 at 3:29 PM, Beta Don said:

Very first oil change!

 

The oil fill cap on the 2.5 is in a bit of an odd place, to say the least.  It's back under the lip of the vent system which means you'll need to custom cut a funnel so you can get it in there.  

 

 

Eureka!  The right funnel for Transit Connect oil changes.

 

71wdy1b9rTL._SL1500_.jpg7198UcTBXCL._SL1500_.jpg

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Fifty150 said:

... in the conventional auto parts store, dealership, or reputable retailer level.

 

This is the only part that makes sense, to me.

 

If someone is buying consumables (automotive or edible) at a swap meet or flea market ... well, they deserve anything and everything that happens to them.

Edited by Mike Chell

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There is a market for that.  Luckily, most of us here are not poor or desperate enough to buy things like that off a card table.  But a lot of people do.  They buy counterfeits, thinking that they're saving money.  Or, that's all that they can afford.  That is why there are so many Ninety-Nine Cents stores.  Look at Japan, with the 100 Yen Shops like Daiso & Ichiban Kan.  Not just here in USA, either.  

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 A Craftsman 3/8" ratchet handle (part no 43175) w/ an oil drain plug socket (GearWrench part no 3874).  A Craftsman oil filter tool (part no 20523) which uses the 3/8" ratchet handle, and/or a 3/4" wrench.  A ChannelLock tongue and groove oil filter plier (part no 212).  A Craftsman T27 torx bit (part no 34488)..  A trim panel, pop rivet remover from Lisle (part no 35260).

 

I don't know if you will be able to find any hand tools Made In U.S.A. today.  A lot of people believe that tools Made in U.S.A. are better.  

 

I like having more than 1 option for removing the oil filter.  In some cars, you are challenged with different angles and limited access.   These 2 tools are what I've learned to like.  I've used other oil filter pliers, and it seems like only the ChannelLock brand really grips and holds onto the filter.  Others I've tried would just slip & slide.  The tool which grabs the filter from the bottom works very well.  My brother in law, who tried a couple of other less expensive versions (all Made in China) claims that the Craftsman one is the only one that grabbed on, held, and did not slip off.  I've only used the Craftsman, and never had a problem.  

 

Everyone has their favorite when it comes to ratchet handles.  I have Snap-On, but yet I reach for the Harbor Freight most of the time.  The one in my "oil change bag" is a relic my dad handed me.  "Here, you'll never see Craftsman Made in U.S.A. anymore.  Take this one."  I think he was right.  I hear that Craftsman is now Made in China.  This one isn't all that great.  It could be longer for more leverage.  More than once, it was too short.  But it's working.  I hear that they do break, and that there is a rebuild kit.  Although I can't recall rebuilding a ratchet handle.  Only one I've ever broken was the Harbor Freight brand, and they just give you a new one.  

 

Everyone I know thinks that those oil drain plug sockets with a magnet to hold onto the drain plug, with the "kung fu action grip", are a gimmick.  But it does do what you need to.  It keeps you from having to spin off a hot drain plug by hand.  And the drain plug won't accidentally drop into the oil pan.  Plus it's nowhere near the "rip-off" of Snap-On 

9/16"–15 mm 12-Point SAE/Metric Pan Plug Wrench

0 stars

51.75 USD

Item: S9615A

S9615A.jpg

 

 

KIMG2010.thumb.JPG.d7ba86200163e26b2b8c7945bb204aaf.JPGKIMG2004.thumb.JPG.71966c05986fcdb1d4b686a951653d7e.JPGKIMG2025.thumb.JPG.40f49ee7eb5efc56ae1bc3b25b18adc4.JPGKIMG2023.thumb.JPG.77c2f8f13563d79c40aecbbe41ad373e.JPGKIMG2039.thumb.JPG.c5f105cf076c8a3bbd003cd69baf9abc.JPGKIMG2041.thumb.JPG.5ad43b3c5488261838956e388a8d7bac.JPG

KIMG2032.JPG

KIMG2011.JPG

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On 6/24/2018 at 5:28 AM, Fifty150 said:

GBL,

 

Which filters do you like?

I have used lots of different brands  of filters, When I change them I use a filter cutter to get element out to drain the oil out .  I have found that some of the filters are nicely made and some are not.  The Napa and Wix are the same and well made.  The Fram is not as nice.  The SuperTech  and Purolator  are well put together .  I have just purchased an STP Mid range and I will report on it when I change the oil next and cut it open.

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Super Tech from Wal*Mart? I would never have thought that it would be well made. 

 

On the next oil change, I may check the MotorCraft FL-1A for fitment. Same size thread, and same gasket position. I recall guys using them on Ford Rangers.

 

I  see all of those videos of filters being cut open.  Never tried myself. 

 

A few years ago, I got a case of FL-400S and I am glad that they fit the Transit Connect.  This is what happens when you have parts for cars you no longer own, hoping that you can use them again in the future.

 

 

 

 

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