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Don Ridley

Add circuits directly to Aux Junction Box using OEM terminals

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2 hours ago, mrtn said:

Amazing difference within the same country. I guess they excluded Puerto Rico.

 

 

No stability what-so-ever in a free market economy.  That's why we all pay different amounts for the same thing.....real estate, fuel, water, milk, produce, meat, lady friends.......prices vary according to region.

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I  reviewed the wiring diagrams and it appears the switched power in the AJB comes through the relay mounted at the top of the AJB.  These circuits are limited to 20 amps by a fuse. You should use the constant "hot" fuse slots in the AJB for most added circuits.

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10 hours ago, Don Ridley said:

I  reviewed the wiring diagrams and it appears the switched power in the AJB comes through the relay mounted at the top of the AJB.  These circuits are limited to 20 amps by a fuse. You should use the constant "hot" fuse slots in the AJB for most added circuits.

Thank You.

 

Good to know when planning future installations.  12V X 20 AMP + maximum of 240 watts.  

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Yes. it will work. I have the same one. You just have to figure out which jaws crimp the wire and which crimp the insulation/strain relief. You will look for reasons to use it once you successfully crimp a connector or terminal!

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Buckethead, 

 

Go ahead and check the passenger side rear corner panel of your vehicle.  That is where I found mine.  As far as I know, they all have them.  Otherwise, where else would they run power for all those items.

 

 

I'll see you around town.

 

 

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Buckethed,

 

It looks like you can simply install your own.  Then you can locate the unit anywhere you want.

http://www.painlessperformance.com/webcat/70107

 

CirKit Boss Auxiliary Fuse Block/7 Circuits By Painless Performance

CirKit Boss Auxiliary Fuse Block/7 Circuits By Painless Performance

P/N 70107

     

CirKit Boss Auxiliary Fuse Block/7 Circuits

Zoom Buy NowmanualIcon.jpg  

 

$89.99

 

   

 

 

  • Application
  • Specs
  • Larger Image
    American Made

 

The safe way to add electrical accessories to any vehicle is with a CirKit Boss™.  The first circuit isolator system available with both constant and ignition hot circuit kits.  Kits include an in-line circuit breaker, relay, relay/fuse block base with preterminated harness and mounting hardware and terminals.  Protects your OEM warranty and is easy to install.

70107- Provides three 20 Amp constant hot and four ignition hot circuits with a maximum total amperage handling of 40 Amps.

This kit includes:

  • One 40 Amp SPST relay
  • One 50 Amp circuit breaker
  • Relay base/fuse block with harness
  • Crimp-on terminals
  • Mounting hardware

 

 

 

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So far, the tools that I've seen are for 14-28 AWG.  Anybody actually find a tool for 12 AWG and larger wire?

 

 
 
 

IWISS Wire Harness Plug Crimping Tool Open Barrel Teminal Crimper for Molex, Delphi,AMP/Tyco, Harley, PC/Computer, Automotive, Weather Pack, Metri-Pack 14-24 AWG

 
 
 
 
 

Price: $22.69 Free Shipping for Prime Members

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This is the crimper I eventually ended up getting specifically for the Metri-pack connectors. Although the dies are marked in mm instead of AWG, it will do 12 AWG.

https://www.amazon.com/Astro-Pneumatic-Tool-9478-Interchangeable/dp/B01CN99TCA/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1503537765&sr=8-4&keywords=astro+crimper

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Just found this tool-only set that is cheaper than the full set with terminal parts that I bought.

In a way it's better because the case includes an instructional diagram plus both metric and AWG sizes on the spaces where the dies are stored.

https://www.amazon.com/Weather-Connector-Terminal-Ratcheting-Crimping/dp/B06XCRS3XY/ref=pd_sim_469_78?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B06XCRS3XY&pd_rd_r=JFWKEB9NYR3AA27M597D&pd_rd_w=Ojppj&pd_rd_wg=Xxqe0&psc=1&refRID=JFWKEB9NYR3AA27M597D

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That really is a big difference in price point, in comparison to the little $20 tools.

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30 years ago I had a tough time justifying the extra cost stepping up from the $5-10 scissor style wire crimpers to the $25 ratchet crimpers. But after being exposed to ratchet crimpers in the Navy (multi-$100 nuke grade ones) I tried the civilian version once I found a pair I could afford as a poorly paid E-4. I wasn't sure if the civ version would perform as well, but it was almost as good as the mil ones. I've been a fan of ratchet crimpers and dedicated dies ever since.

Similarly, when I started with the Weather Pack connectors I bought the scissor style crimper for them. But as you mentioned earlier, it didn't do 12 AWG and the two step crimp and poorer fit of the tool made the job harder than it needed to be. Some of my other crimpers were able to get the job done on the larger wires. Once I decided the Weather Pack connectors were something I would like to continue using in the future, I started looking for an appropriate ratchet crimper. I went with the kit since it let me store the assortment of small parts along with the crimper. I actually removed the body parts to another organizer to let me store more terminals in the crimper box.

The biggest advantage to the ratchet crimpers is repeatability and reliability. It's easy to over or under crimp when using the scissor style crimpers and it's usually a multi-step crimp. It takes some experience and skill to get consistently dependable crimps. Ratchet crimpers do a better job with a lower skill requirement. Match the wire size / terminal connector / crimper die and you're almost guaranteed to get a good strong reliable connection. My only regret is that I didn't come across those Astro crimpers years ago. All my other ratchet crimpers require removing screws to change dies. These Astro versions just slide into place. I'm giving serious consideration to buying an entire Astro set just for the added convenience, although the metric markings are a drawback.

I also became a fan of the die style wire strippers for similar reasons. The full insulation cut without damaging the conductors, along with grip and pull action of the tool, makes that job much easier also. If you only have a small stub of wire accessible in a repair situation, it lets you do the job one handed in tight spots. I've seen the more universal size auto grip strippers but never really used them since I was already hooked on the die style.

https://www.amazon.com/Capri-Tools-20010-Precision-Stripper/dp/B01018CVM0/ref=sr_1_12?s=power-hand-tools&ie=UTF8&qid=1503544026&sr=1-12&keywords=wire+stripper

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A second advantage  to ratchet crimpers is that the dies used in the ratchet crimpers often do multiple crimps at once. The bare wire connection needs one size/style of crimp and the insulated area of the wire needs a different size/style crimp. For example, the Weather Pack connector has that B shaped crimp on the wire and an O shaped crimp around the weather seal. The cheap scissor style crimper has two holes for doing these crimps in two steps and getting the tool place in the right spot on the terminal makes a big difference. The tool width also has to be sized for the thinnest depth of any of the multiple openings. The die on the more expensive ratchet tool does both crimps at the same time with each being the appropriate type, width, and spacing needed. So you can have deeper crimp areas on larger wires to hold them better, and smaller crimp areas on smaller wires and terminals.

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All good points.  

 

There are always good points when buying a more expensive tool.  But only 1 point matters.  It does the job better.  

I'm not trying to make a career out of this.  I simply want to add a few circuits.  No more than 3 -5 at most.  Any more, and that is just way too much wiring to run (I'm lazy).  Fuse taps have always worked in the past.

I have a Channellock oil filter plier.  I cannot quite articulate it.  But it just works better.  Does that justify spending $45, when Harbor Freight has something just like it for about $5?  And for what it's worth, I cut, strip, and crimp wires with a Channellock tool.  Hard to believe that is being sold for about $45.  This is why some of us own Snap On tools, and some guys have tools from the bargain bin @ Pep Boys..  

 

 

  • Channellock OF-1 2-Piece Oil Filer/PVC Plier Gift Set: 12-Inch and 15-Inch
Click to open expanded view
 
 

Channellock OF-1 2-Piece Oil Filer/PVC Plier Gift Set: 12-Inch and 15-Inch

 
 
 
 
 

Price: $43.67  | FREE One-Day

 

 

  • Channellock 908 8.5" Wire Strippers
Click to open expanded view
 
 

Channellock 908 8.5" Wire Strippers

 
 
 
 
 

Price: $44.98 & FREE Shipping

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Open Barrel Terminals: for AWG 20-18/16-14/12-10 

 
  • Astro 9477 Professional Quick Interchangeable Ratchet Crimping Tool Set, 7-Piece
Roll over image to zoom in
 
 

Astro 9477 Professional Quick Interchangeable Ratchet Crimping Tool Set, 7-Piece

 
 
 
 

Price: $64.99  | FREE One-Day

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That's the one I was thinking of getting to replace my existing ratchet crimpers.

I have way too many tools. Somebody once asked if there was any tool I didn't have and my reply was "Only the first time."

Assorted sources, HF / Craftsman, etc. I tend to go HF on infrequent or one time use items, expecially if they are special purpose ones. It's the only affordable solution for lots of jobs. But quality tools can really make a difference in ease, efficiency, and longevity of repairs.

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I never rule out Harbor Freight.  I have a socket set from there that I picked up for about $3+change, plus it came with a free set of screwdrivers.  It sits behind my driver's seat in the cab of my pick up.  It has done more than it's $3 worth of work.  A couple of oil changes, swap out the OEM stereo to an aftermarket unit, taking off body parts & removing headlights to change lamps, removing trim panels & kick plates, building furniture from IKEA......sometimes all that you need is a functioning ratchet handle & socket.  Best part is that Harbor Freight has a lifetime warranty on all of their hand tools.

 

Automotive Connectors Mcp2,8 Bu-Kont Edshttps://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0137JZ2TY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I bought 5 of these for $7.54 on amazon.com a while back, since the price was right & I didn't have to buy 100.  Now a buddy of mine wanted a couple, and the price for 5 has shot up to $70.54 + $4.99 for shipping.  Funny how pricing and availability changes.  

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Every once in awhile, I still keep my eyes open for this kind of stuff.  

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Screenshot 2021-01-28 at 00.27.08.png

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Anyone have a line on someplace that can source these terminals right now or have some they're willing to sell? All the usual suspects are out of stock and listing as much as a 21 week delay for restocking.

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Don's helping me with the smaller ones but if anyone has a lead on the ones for 10-gauge wire, let me know.

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