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Beta Don

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  1. Haha
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in radiator upgrade   
    The stock radiator didn't work well enough when it was new??
     
    Don
  2. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from Bean in Upgrade instrument cluster 2016   
    You will need a Torx T-15 screwdriver to remove the four screws holding the IPC to the dash.  The top two screws will be obvious when the top cover is removed.  The bottom two are hidden behind a removable cover that clips to the dash and the steering column with a bit of vinyl in between  -  That one can be a bit tricky to get disconnected from the steering column.  Use extreme care not to drop either of the bottom screws into the bowels of the dash, where they might never be found again!
     
    Don
  3. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from Hanover Fiste in Insurance Issues with personal use   
    We truly live in different worlds.  I've never seen a 'commercial zone' where I couldn't drive my passenger car, nor a street with signage saying 'Commercial Vehicles Only'  -  Quite the opposite, all I ever do see as far as restrictive signage on streets around here is 'No Trucks'
     
    Don
  4. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from regcruz in Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) battery   
    Starting batteries don't make good deep cycle batteries, but the reverse isn't necessarily true.  The AGM I installed has 50% more "cold cranking amps" than the stock battery and they wouldn't rate it that way if it wasn't intended to see duty as a starting battery, nor would they be offering a three year free replacement.  As a general rule, AGM's handle higher recharge currents much better than flooded batteries do
     
    I have a 1994 Miata which came with an AGM battery mounted in the trunk  -  AGM's are the stock battery in many more cars these days.  Anyway, I replaced the OEM battery in my Miata with a deep cycle Optima Yellow top  and that lasted me almost exactly 10 years before I had to replace it . . . . with another deep cycle Optima
     
    When the AGM I put in my TC fails, I'll report back here . . . . if this forum is still around then  ;-)
     
    Don
  5. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from zalienz in Sofa recliner..will it fit in a 2016 xlt lwb cargo?   
    That would depend entirely on the physical dimensions of the sofa/recliner you're looking at  -  They vary all over the place, depending on the style and who made the one you're looking at   -   Kinda like asking "Will my boat on my friends trailer fit under the low clearance bridge near my house??"  😋
     
    Don
  6. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in 2013/gen1 TPMS issue   
    IMO, $60 would make a $200 improvement in the way they look on your van  -  As it is, they scream "SOMETHING IS MISSING HERE!!"
     
    Don
  7. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from OLDSCHOOLFOOL in What wheels fit 2010-2013 TransitC USA   
    . . . . .  assuming the offset of both wheels is close to the same
     
    Don
  8. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) battery   
    Several of us who converted to the Group 48 size and AGM format did so because we are running things off the battery and not just using it to start the engine, so we wanted more power, more reserve capacity and less self discharge
     
    I carry a pair of full sized Segway I2's in the back and I wanted to be able to charge them using an inverter while driving and I didn't want to have to shut down the inverter when I stop for gas , or lunch, or shopping along the way.  I installed a 750 watt inverter in the back of the van fed by a #4 wire and a 70 amp fuse, powered off the battery.  Others are running refrigerators and other things, usually with inverters, so stuffing the most reserve amp hours into the stock battery box was a good idea . . . . and it has worked well for all of us
     
    Don
  9. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in Locating a Race Red Titanium....   
    It's always best (cheapest) to buy any vehicle from the dealer who has it sitting on his lot and not asking another dealer to have it shipped to you  -  BOTH dealers will expect to make $$$ for their time and trouble.  In your case, since you're looking for the hen's teeth of all TC's, both dealers will know you're desperate and expect to make a bunch of $$$ from you, because all three of you know how rare this particular vehicle is . . . . whereas, if you were to show up at the dealer who has the vehicle, asking about a Titanium TC and they show you the red one you really want, you could say "Red, huh?  Don't you have it in a better color??"  Then, you could probably make a deal on the red one that he's had sitting unsold on his lot for a month or two  -  He was thinking it might be very hard to sell, so he gives you a break, rather than you pointing out that he has the only red one in all the USA and you've got to have a RED one!
     
    Don
  10. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from windguy in Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) battery   
    Actually, it's a bit more complicated than that.  The front side of the battery box is also a high power fused distribution point and you'll have to cut some cable ties so you can fold that forward far enough to get the old battery out and the new one in.  Getting the larger AGM in there isn't what I would call a simple task  -  I've changed batteries in dozens of cars over the years and this one would rank up there as the most difficult exchange I can ever recall doing . . . . and I'll BET you'll agree after you get yours replaced 
     
    As I said in my post at the beginning of this thread, if you buy a battery from a place that offers free installation, *by all means* take them up on it!  -  They'll probably think twice before they offer to do another TC
     
    Don
  11. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in 2015 battery replacement, weird size and PITA   
    My point was . . . . forums are all about sharing solutions to problems and if the vehicle has been around for awhile, most problems have been addressed several times so you won't be making the same mistakes others have already made in the past
     
    The Sam's Club battery is taller, but there is a lower space in the center of the battery which allows you to use the stock hold down clamp with no problem.   The Interstate battery must be designed differently . . . . good to know
     
    No Sam's Club?  Can't be THAT far away  -  When I needed AGM 6 volt Golf Cart batteries for my boat, they were not stocked in any Sam's Club in Mississippi, but I found them at a store in Alabama.  Road trip!  -  I drove past 2 or 3 other Sam's Clubs to get to the one with the batteries I needed 😋
  12. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in 2015 battery replacement, weird size and PITA   
    You should read here first and then post later  -  Several good threads here on Gen2 battery replacement and better batteries to use than the stock, overpriced and under performing battery
     
    A Sam's Club Duracell AGM size 48 (H6) is a perfect fit with no modifications necessary and the stock hold downs fit correctly.  You then have a bigger, more powerful, AGM battery which will outlast the stock battery 3 to 1
     
    Don
  13. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from windguy in Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) battery   
    Actually, it's a bit more complicated than that.  The front side of the battery box is also a high power fused distribution point and you'll have to cut some cable ties so you can fold that forward far enough to get the old battery out and the new one in.  Getting the larger AGM in there isn't what I would call a simple task  -  I've changed batteries in dozens of cars over the years and this one would rank up there as the most difficult exchange I can ever recall doing . . . . and I'll BET you'll agree after you get yours replaced 
     
    As I said in my post at the beginning of this thread, if you buy a battery from a place that offers free installation, *by all means* take them up on it!  -  They'll probably think twice before they offer to do another TC
     
    Don
  14. Confused
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in Cargo Cover   
    I bought one of these from my local Ford dealer for $165 shortly after I bought my 2014 SWB van  -  I returned it to them less than a week later.  The red circle you see in the photos is to remind you not to sit anything on top of it, because it's really flimsy!
     
    I had the factory cargo covers for 2 of my Mazda wagons and I *assumed* the Ford one would be similar, but they're not  -  You could sit a small child on the  Mazda covers and not bend anything  -  Don't try more than 4 or 5 pounds on the Ford cover
     
    Don
  15. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from 916Janitorial in 2010 XLT Slammed   
    That sounds like a TON of time and money to be pouring into a ten year old vehicle . . . . and you probably only increased it's value (if any) by about 20% of what you spent.  Personally, if *I* was going to do something similar, I'd start out with a 2018 or 19 with very few miles so I could enjoy driving my new creation for many years and miles . . . . and hopefully get back some of my money when I went to sell it later on
     
    Don
  16. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in Ford Transit Connect Manual Transmission Kit   
    You do realize . . . . that was more than 6 years ago . . . . right?
     
    Don
  17. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from windguy in GEN 2 CARGO VAN RUST   
    I agree  -  I'm 98% sure the damp, salty gear is the source of your problem . . . . and I doubt a 'paint warranty' would be honored for the inside of your van.  Even if it was, their repair might be worse looking than what you have now
     
    Don
  18. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in Oil Change Required   
    For any synthetic worth a hoot, 5K is way too soon to be changing your oil  -  Way, WAY too soon!  Ford and most synthetic manufacturers recommend 12K changes.  I use Castrol Edge Extended Performance fully synthetic and Castrol says it is good for 20K changes
     
    I typically change at 10 to 12K on mine because I don't drive it that many miles each year . . . . without the oil change reminder recommending me to change it sooner.  But . . . . if you don't reset the change reminder each and every time you do a change, then the change reminder is never going to give you good information . . . . it's eventually going to tell you to change it at some point, and that may end up being only 2 or 3K after your last change.  Read the manual on how to reset it after you do a change, even though it has never gone off and told you a change was necessary.  Reset the change reminder every single time, regardless . . . .  especially if you intend to use it as recommended
     
    If yours was reset when a change was done and then you went 5K and changed it without resetting it and you got a change notice 4K later, it's actually telling you that you needed a change at 9K and not at 5K when you last did it . . . . or, more likely, you probably missed resetting it twice and what it's actually telling you is that it should be changed at 14K  -  Mine never says a change is needed before 12K . . . . but I reset it every time
     
    At any rate, 5K changes with fully synthetic oil is certainly a waste of time, money and natural resources.  Google and read all about modern oil, modern engines and synthetic oil change mileage recommendations
     
    Don
  19. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from operating engineer O/O in Larger Wheels   
    http://fordstnation.com/focus-st-tires-rims/8868-19-vs-18-rims-focus-st.html
    "Avoid 19's. Unless you live somewhere with ice sheet smooth roads. The 18's on this car are already a bit thin on sidewalls. I know a guy who has bent 4 wheels of the course of 1 year (normal street driving), and I bent one enough to where I replaced it. 17's are much nicer (I have those for winter)."
    If the 18's are that easy to bend on a Focus, they eon't be any less likely to bend on a TC
    'Nuff said
    Don 
  20. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from operating engineer O/O in Larger Wheels   
    First, I have zero 'paranoia' with upsizing to larger wheels  -  I've done it myself on more than one vehicle.  So long as you stay with the stock overall circumference of the tires *and* you can find properly sized tires correctly rated for the vehicle you're driving there's no problem . . . . other than a rougher ride and the distinct possibility of bending a wheel
    All FWD vehicles use wheels where the spokes are about flush with the outside of the wheel and that makes the inside lip of the wheel very easy to bend.  My daughter's Mazda 5 came with 205/50R17's and she managed to bend all 4 of the OEM alloys during the life of the OEM set of tires  -  None of them badly bent, mind you, but enough that the tire store refused to mount new tires on them.  We bought a new set of Mazda 3 take-off wheels and she bent 2 of those with the second set of tires.  Her car weighs 3,500 pounds and she never carries more than 2 or 3 people in it
    Gen 2 TC's are all rated at more than 5,000 lbs GVWR  -  I'm not sure of your definition of 'light vehicle' but ours are heavy enough that they require specially rated tires rated to carry the weight.  Only a small percentage of the available 215/55R16's are rated for our vehicle and when you go up to 17's or 18's, the selection is even smaller.  True, *you* can mount any tire you like, rated correctly or not, *but* you'll have to do a bit of hunting to find a tire store which would mount them  -  In the event of a fatal accident caused by the use of incorrectly rated tires, the store you bought them from would most certainly be held liable in the ensuing lawsuit
    You can take my word for it (or not) but the 18's from the Focus ST will be very easy to bend on a vehicle as heavy as a TC, so unless you have better roads in your neck of the woods than we have here, I would most certainly buy an extra wheel or two while you can find them  -  Likely you'll need one or two sooner than you think
    Don
  21. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from operating engineer O/O in Larger Wheels   
    The sidewalls aren't taller  -  The 16's have a 4.66" sidewall and the 18's are only 4.16".  That's over 10% shorter
    His 235/45R18's are 4% larger in circumference than the 16's, so the speedo should be off by that same amount.  The ride will be noticeably worse of course and with the slightly shorter sidewalls, you'd need to be careful of bending a wheel if you hit a chuck hole
    Don
  22. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from JamesRich in TPMS question   
    What's NOT wrong is . . . . if you check your tires once a month, or twice a month or once a week, at least you will know exactly what your pressures are . . . . that day  -  That's much better than most of the driving public, so you're slightly ahead of the game
     
    But, with some tires now costing upwards of $200 per corner it would be very nice to know when you've picked up a nail that's now causing a slow leak . . . . before you've driven far enough on the low tire to destroy it's structure.  *If* you discover that low tire during one of your weekly/monthly tire pressure checks, of course you immediately air it up and go looking for someone to patch the leak.  *If* they dismount the tire from the wheel to do a proper repair from the inside, a quick inspection will tell them if you've already destroyed the tire or not . . . . but many places will just offer you the quick $15 tire plug repair, air it up and send you on your way.  When the tire comes apart without any warning a month or so later, *maybe* you'll be able to keep it right side up and on the road and all you'll need is a tow back to the tire shop and a new tire
     
    The other downside is, very few of us actually religiously keep to our own schedule of monthly/weekly tire pressure checks, even though we know how important they are, so our odds of catching the slow leak before it ruins a $200 tire are even slimmer than they might appear
     
    What's really *nice* it to get behind the wheel, flick a switch on the steering wheel and see an actual readout of the pressure in all 4 tires before we even start the car.   Instead of a 'couple minutes of easy work' once a month, it's 5 seconds of no work at all every time you start the car.  There's nothing safer than that and the cost is less than replacing one tire.  If your car's system isn't that elaborate, at least knowing all 4 tires have enough air in them to keep the warning light from coming on is the next best thing  -  I still do my manual checks about once a month to replace the pound or two that usually leaks away every month . . . . but that low tire light NOT flashing on the dash is also VERY reassuring, at least it is to me
     
    Don 
  23. Like
    Beta Don got a reaction from JamesRich in TPMS question   
    What's NOT wrong is . . . . if you check your tires once a month, or twice a month or once a week, at least you will know exactly what your pressures are . . . . that day  -  That's much better than most of the driving public, so you're slightly ahead of the game
     
    But, with some tires now costing upwards of $200 per corner it would be very nice to know when you've picked up a nail that's now causing a slow leak . . . . before you've driven far enough on the low tire to destroy it's structure.  *If* you discover that low tire during one of your weekly/monthly tire pressure checks, of course you immediately air it up and go looking for someone to patch the leak.  *If* they dismount the tire from the wheel to do a proper repair from the inside, a quick inspection will tell them if you've already destroyed the tire or not . . . . but many places will just offer you the quick $15 tire plug repair, air it up and send you on your way.  When the tire comes apart without any warning a month or so later, *maybe* you'll be able to keep it right side up and on the road and all you'll need is a tow back to the tire shop and a new tire
     
    The other downside is, very few of us actually religiously keep to our own schedule of monthly/weekly tire pressure checks, even though we know how important they are, so our odds of catching the slow leak before it ruins a $200 tire are even slimmer than they might appear
     
    What's really *nice* it to get behind the wheel, flick a switch on the steering wheel and see an actual readout of the pressure in all 4 tires before we even start the car.   Instead of a 'couple minutes of easy work' once a month, it's 5 seconds of no work at all every time you start the car.  There's nothing safer than that and the cost is less than replacing one tire.  If your car's system isn't that elaborate, at least knowing all 4 tires have enough air in them to keep the warning light from coming on is the next best thing  -  I still do my manual checks about once a month to replace the pound or two that usually leaks away every month . . . . but that low tire light NOT flashing on the dash is also VERY reassuring, at least it is to me
     
    Don 
  24. Haha
    Beta Don got a reaction from jrm223 in CargoSlide CG1000 with Hilti Toolbox and dividers   
    My telling you he lives in LA wasn't 'helpful'??  Guess I shouldn't have bothered!
     
    Don
  25. Thanks
    Beta Don got a reaction from zalienz in Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) battery   
    An update on my Sam's Club AGM experience
     
    This past August, we drove the TC over to Titusville Florida (600 miles) to pick up a motor home we'd bought.  Sometimes, we go a month or two or even longer between uses of the TC because we have 3 electric cars we drive every day, so the TC only gets used for long trips or when we need to haul something big or tow something.  Put the TC back in the garage, but as it turned out,  I forgot to unplug the GPS from our 'always on'  power socket.  When I needed to move it again about 3 weeks later so the Propane delivery guy could drag a hose through the garage, it wouldn't start.  Checked the battery with a voltmeter  -  4.6 volts!!
     
    Toasted my AGM battery, or so I thought.  Voltage was so low a conventional battery charger wouldn't recognize it, but I have an old 6 amp charger that will work with anything, so I hooked it up to that and it took 3 days to put enough power in it to where the TC would start.  Had an occasion a few days later to drive it over to Mobile (60 miles) and when I got ready to leave to come back, it wouldn't start again.  Got a jump, drove it home and hooked it back up to the 6 amp charger and left it for a week or two
     
    Drove it once more since then and it started OK, so I bought a little Battery Tender Jr and I've kept it on that ever since
     
    Anyway, I got to thinking about Sam's Club's 3 year Free Replacement Warranty and since I bought the battery in April of 2017 (and it was manufactured in January of 2017) I'm getting near the end of that 3 years, so . . . . I took the battery out of the TC to take to Sam's to get a free replacement.  The Battery Tender has kept it at 13.2 volts for the past couple months and I realized that Sam's would no doubt load check the battery to make sure it's actually bad before they give me another one, and not wanting any surprises at the store, I figured maybe I'd better check it myself before I took it over there
     
    So, I hook the battery up to an inverter and plugged a 200 watt 120 volt light bulb into the inverter to use for a load.  It's drawing right at 20 amps from the battery and I expected the battery voltage to go south pretty quickly.  I could not believe what happened next!!  After an HOUR of providing 20 amps to the inverter, the battery voltage had sagged to 12.15 volts (it was 12.25 under load when I started the test) and when I shut it off, the battery voltage rose (over a 4 or 5 minute period) to 12.55 volts.  12.6 is a full battery!
     
    So much for taking it to Sam's for a free replacement  -  I might as well put it back in the TC and see how long it lasts, 'cause they're sure not gonna give me another one when they do their own load test on it
     
    In my opinion, it's one heck of a battery  -  Sitting for an extended period at less than 6 volts and then coming back to life like it has is VERY impressive!
     
    Don
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