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Just got myself a 2016 Titanium Wagon.  I want to do some sound deadening to quiet down our horrid road noise here in Washington State, probably the noisiest freeways in the country. I figure if I quiet it down a wee bit I'll be happy keeping the vehicle for a long time.

 

Anyone do this and have tips on where to start?  I figure Dynamat type deadener in key spots, maybe some insulation in the voids.  I'm not going to go overkill, so want to focus on the biggest improvements for the least amount of material.  My Q is whether it's better to start in the floor or in the walls.  Seems like the rear of the van is noisier than the front.

 

At some point I'll also pull the front carpet to put in a mini-subwoofer in the little storage compartment under the passenger seat.  Sound dampening, a small sub, and a garment rack for work will be the beginning and end of my mods.

 

Cheers,

Justin

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Front doors, wheel wells. It's not perfect tho as most of the road noise comes in from the suspension as it's a rather simple McPherson setup.

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I used an alternative to Dynamat, called B Quiet. https://www.b-quiet.com/

 

I installed B-Quiet ultimate to the front floor, both front doors, A-pillars, B-Pillars and the roof above the headliner. I also installed B-Quiet V-Comp to the floor and both front doors on top of the Ultimate.  I have a Ranger MaxView Partition installed, so I don't get the sound from the cargo area of the van. It is much quieter and comfortable to drive after the installation. However, I did a road trip through Washington State in 2017 and I can agree with you the roads there are very loud, even with the insulation, I was a bit shocked at how loud it was. But on smooth roads, boy it's a dream, and the audio system is so much clearer. Hope this helps. I think it was worth the cost and effort.

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7 hours ago, JustinVP said:

Just got myself a 2016 Titanium Wagon.  I want to do some sound deadening to quiet down our horrid road noise here in Washington State, probably the noisiest freeways in the country. I figure if I quiet it down a wee bit I'll be happy keeping the vehicle for a long time.

 

Anyone do this and have tips on where to start?  I figure Dynamat type deadener in key spots, maybe some insulation in the voids.  I'm not going to go overkill, so want to focus on the biggest improvements for the least amount of material.  My Q is whether it's better to start in the floor or in the walls.  Seems like the rear of the van is noisier than the front.

 

At some point I'll also pull the front carpet to put in a mini-subwoofer in the little storage compartment under the passenger seat.  Sound dampening, a small sub, and a garment rack for work will be the beginning and end of my mods.

 

Cheers,

Justin

There are few threads regarding sound proofing. Use the search option.

Try this one     http://fordtransitconnectforum.com/topic/6555-sound-deadening-solution-for-noisy-vans/?tab=comments&_fromLogin=1

I have a 2015 cargo van and have bought sound proofing material to be installed this spring. Needs to be warm outside >53deg F.

Most of the major sound proofing suppliers recommend two layers of material, a sound deadener material and then a thermal/sound mat over that.

I first bought a box of Noico 80mil but felt it was too heavy to put on the ceiling so I plan to use that for the floor area only and perhaps the rear side panels in the back.

I then bought a box of Kilmat 50mil for the ceiling, sliding door and rear barn doors. It's 1/2 the weight of the Noice 80mil. Both distributed by the same company through Amazon and Noico products are made in the Republic of Russia. Seriously. I never bought anything made in Russia.

I also bought two boxes of the Noico 150mil mat liner to cover all areas with sound proofing plus the required roller for the sound proofing install. About $243 for all materials.

For short drives by myself the road noise isn't an issue as I just turn up the radio. But for extended road trips with my wife it's very noticeable and somewhat annoying. Looking forward to this project. I'll provide updates after I do the install.

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good luck with your project

Ear Muff Radio.png

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@GBL, those should come with every vehicle registration in WA!

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13 hours ago, windguy said:

I then bought a box of Kilmat 50mil for the ceiling, sliding door and rear barn doors. It's 1/2 the weight of the Noice 80mil. Both distributed by the same company through Amazon and Noico products are made in the Republic of Russia. Seriously. I never bought anything made in Russia.

 

I wouldn’t buy anything more complicated Russian made than tar mat. That’s about the level they perform without screwing it up. Seen it up close for way too long.

 

Unless you need the mat for your roof, a Russian product will probably leak and spontaeously combust.

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I bought RoadKill for my 2012, since these products are all pretty much the same and it's available on Amazon.

IMG_5371.thumb.JPG.62e92ba7eb95be0ee23efc64ac463820.JPG












 

 


BTW: Look what Ford puts inside the front doors, from the factory:

IMG_5390.thumb.JPG.ce74118349fc2d275a4df3e2bb1de455.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, mrtn said:

 

Unless you need the mat for your roof, a Russian product will probably leak and spontaneously combust

Knowing where you are I am not surprised at your View!!

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JustinVP,

 

I added sound deadening materials to my 2016 wagon. After reviewing lengthy discussions on car audio forums. there are two types of sound deadeners: 1. Heavy material to keep the metal from "ringing" and 2. Dense material to absorb sounds. The technical details are more complicated buy you get the idea.

 

I used a Dynamat-like material (Second skin Damplifier Pro) on the door panels and floor. These materials only need 50% coverage to be effective. They can be difficult to install and are mainly for improving the audio quality of your sound system. However, Ford already adds similar material to much of the body, ceiling and floor because it works on road noise also. 

 

What may be more effective at reducing road noise is adding padding to all of the door and cargo area panels. I used Thermozite:

http://www.upholsterysupplyonline.com/products/Double-sided-thermozite-heat-shield-padding.html

 

Apply with spray on glue. Removing the panels requires panel removal tools. Amazon has dozens:

https://www.amazon.com/Tresalto-Auto-Trim-Removal-Tool/dp/B01L8GHB7O/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1522545499&sr=8-7&keywords=panel+removal+tools

 

Removing the front door panels can be tricky. Here are some instructions:

I really like the sound and feel the Thermozite adds. Does it really make the interior much quieter? I can't say for sure. The first couple of panels will take you a while to insulate, but it gets easier as you go.

 

 

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On 3/29/2018 at 5:47 AM, G B L said:

good luck with your project

 

LOL! You crack me up! And you're right - headphones are the perfect solution - as long as you need to talk to anyone. I did a little insulating in the back of mine, but eventually just gave up. It's so much hassle to do, it's just not practical. And it still doesn't have a major effect. After bearing the road noise and the door rattles you eventually give up and start using the old adage, "Hey...It's a van."

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Not sure what condition your tires are in, but when it comes time to replace them, do look into getting a type that has been tested to produce low noise.  It can really make a difference.  On a 2001 Ford Focus wagon that’s recently needed it’s tires replaced (to a large extent because of how noisey the old ones had gotten!) I researched different tires and went with this pirelli model which was tested to produce very low noise:

 

(Tire rack user surveys rated it 9.1/10 ride quality and 8.9/10 in noise.)

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Pirelli&tireModel=Cinturato+P7+All+Season+Plus

 

Extremely happy with the low-noise pirelli’s on the Focus wagon, which may not be all that unlike the transit connect.  Would consider doing something similar for the transit connect.  Not sure what the noise qualities are on the original tires the transit connects come with, but it seems very often, tires can be noisier just as they wear.  How much they are inflated them can have some affect on noise and subject ride quality (Generally all referred to as “NVH” = noise, vibration, and harshness in the auto trade)

 

By the way, I just looked at the extra set of wheels my 2014 transit connect came (which are the original 16” tires and according to the seller also the original 16” tires), and it they are “Continental ContiProContact”:

 

(Tirerack user surveys rated at only 7.4/10 in ride quality and 7.0/10 in noise)

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Continental&tireModel=ContiProContact

 

 

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Posted (edited)

[Forum would not let me edit previous post to correct typeographical errors, so here is the corrected version - feel free to disregard post above and mods, feel free to delete]

 

Not sure what condition your tires are in, but when it comes time to replace them, do look into getting a type that has been tested to produce low noise.  In my experience driving on WA state roads, this can really make a difference!

 

On a 2001 Ford Focus wagon that needed its tires replaced (to a large extent simply because of how noisey the old ones had gotten!  Suggest avoiding “Cooper” tires if noise is important), I researched different tires and went with a Pirelli tire model which was tested to produce very low noise:

 

(Tire rack user surveys rated it 9.1/10 ride quality and 8.9/10 in noise.)

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Pirelli&tireModel=Cinturato+P7+All+Season+Plus

 

My family has been extremely happy with the low-noise Pirelli’s on our Focus wagon, which I think is not much unlike our 2014 Transit Connect in how they ride and drive.  (E.g., Both are “non-luxury”, front-wheel drive Fords.)  When the transit connect is due for tires, I’d consider doing something similar with using a “quiet” tire.

 

By the way, I just looked at the extra set of wheels my 2014 used transit connect came with (which are the original 16” tires, and according to the seller, also the original tires), and it seems those are “Continental ContiProContact”:

 

(And for what it’s worth, I see Tirerack user surveys rated these “original” tires at only 7.4/10 in ride quality and 7.0/10 in noise)

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Continental&tireModel=ContiProContact

 

Edited by jakeru
Pesky iPad virtual keyboard

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Posted (edited)

Duly noted are comments on the tires ... low noise rubber seems to have the best bang for reducing interior noise..

 

Oft overlooked, products like dynamat not only block sound, but they deaden vibrations in the metal it's applied to. The better the adhesion, the more damping, and the better the results. I use a rubber roller to make sure it's stuck tight. Trade off there is, it ain't never coming off.

 

Also wondering if anyone's tried the low expansion foam from the local hardware store for the frame members of the doors and sides? Seems to me those could make pretty good echo chambers if ignored.

 

And ... if a lot of the noise is due to the front suspension, maybe a couple layers of old school rustproofing in the wells would be a good thing? Seems to me there's still some shops that still spray it professionally.

Edited by sKiZo

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You shouldn't spray PU foam anywhere in the car, ever.

Old school rust proofing following a good clean and drying helps with road noise. Something thick and heavy, tar like substance.

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Do Polymethylenepolyphenyl polyisocyanate, polypropyleneglycol copolymer isomers and homologues count? <G>

 

Wondering why the warning ... same sort of stuff they use to insulate refrigerators nowadays. There's certainly aerosol danger when it's fresh, but the low expansion stuff is basically inert once it sets. It'll go brittle if exposed to moisture, but that's about it. Open all the doors and ventilate with a fan and I figure that would minimize any exposure hazard.

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On 4/6/2018 at 2:59 PM, jakeru said:

[Forum would not let me edit previous post to correct typeographical errors, so here is the corrected version - feel free to disregard post above and mods, feel free to delete]

 

 

I make it a point not to delete stuff unless it is a issue, or the poster wants it removed. So if you wish it to be gone I can make it happen,  just say the word. 

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On 4/8/2018 at 1:47 AM, sKiZo said:

Wondering why the warning ... same sort of stuff they use to insulate refrigerators nowadays. There's certainly aerosol danger when it's fresh, but the low expansion stuff is basically inert once it sets. It'll go brittle if exposed to moisture, but that's about it. Open all the doors and ventilate with a fan and I figure that would minimize any exposure hazard.

 

Because you would not know if there's moisture behind it and if positive then there's no way for the moisture to evaporate/drain. 

 

Enter: rust.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/12/2018 at 6:44 AM, mrtn said:

 

Because you would not know if there's moisture behind it and if positive then there's no way for the moisture to evaporate/drain. 

 

Enter: rust.

 

Huh - wouldna thought that would be an issue with closed cell foam. Wonder if pre-treating the surfaces with a couple coats of spray  PlastiDip would prevent that sort of thing?  I've seen folk paint their cars with the stuff and just peel it off when they want a new look, with no damage to the original surface. Personally sprayed several sets of wheels over the years and it's held up well, with no rust or bubbling.

 

Bonus - the plastidip would allow you to remove the foam if you had to for body work and such.

Edited by sKiZo

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