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My 'schedule'is to do the 13 quart dump and refill every 25,000 miles

We had a small Mitsubishi van years ago and it had a standard drain plug on the auto trans pan.  Every other 3K engine oil change,I would dump the trans and put in 2 1/2 quarts of new fluid  -  I think with the converter it held 7 quarts total, so about every 10,000 miles, we had changed the trans fluid.  I really liked that arrangement, but unfortunately very few manufacturers put a drain plug in the trans pan

Don

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My rig just turned 51000mi, Will do the Trans flush soon.  Although you can't change the filter the trans drain plug makes the fluid change easy .  13 Qts will clear the fluid nicely . 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, G B L said:

Although you can't change the filter the trans drain plug makes the fluid change easy .  

Did they change this one the 2nd Gen ? I just done my flush and filter change a couple thousand miles ago on my 2012. Below is a look under the oil pan of the 2012 transmission. The big black plastic with the small yellow square in the middle is the filter on these. 

large.20170522_191809.jpg.3951b5e58cd0cb29d1345fdc87291036.jpg

Edited by BSUPC
Added picture of under the trans oil pan.

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The 6F35 Select Shift 6 speed transmission used in the Gen 2's is completely different from the 4 speed in your early model.  There isn't a transmission pan on the bottom that you can remove and the filter is buried deep within the trans so you cannot change it

Supposedly it's a 'Lifetime Fill' transmission which requires no maintenance during it's 'lifetime' but if you want it to last as long as your TC, everyone (including your Ford dealer) recommends fluid changes every 25 to 30K and since fluid changes are so much less expensive than trans rebuilds, it's a no-brainer in my book  -  I really hate to throw away money on something that regular maintenance can prevent  :spend:

Don

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17 hours ago, Beta Don said:

'Lifetime Fill' transmission which requires no maintenance during it's 'lifetime' 

Not making fun of you Don, but this made me laugh so hard I fell out of my chair.  I love when they say something never needs maintenance. I guess this is the results you get when you try to take a work van and try to cater it to the soccer moms. Glad I got the 2012 now.   I really do not know much about the gen 2's. But if I ever have to get another work van I guess I will make the step up to the Transit instead.

 

Maintenance free. lol

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I did lots of research before buying our TC  -  The big question I needed answers to was did I want the 2.0 with the 4 speed auto or the 2.5 with the 6 speed.  Hands down, that's a no-brainer, so we went shopping for a used 2014 or 2015 . . . . whatever we could get the best deal on  -  Once I did  the research, we never looked at a Gen 1

We cruise at 2250 RPM at 70 mph and the torquey 2.5 can pull it OK up most hills without down shifting to 5th.  6th is a true 'overdrive' as 5th at 70 mph gets you 3,000 RPM and at that RPM it will pull just about any grade without needing to downshift again

The fact that they advertise the transmission as 'maintenance free' is actually a good thing, IMO.  If they don't expect transmission problems for those who bought the Ford extended warranty and don't do any maintenance, imagine how reliable it will be for those of us who are doing regular fluid changes.  I do wish they had given us a dipstick to check the level though  -  The procedure we need to use is a bit labor intensive . . . . but then, it's only needed once every 25K

The 6F35 was jointly developed by Ford and GM and it's an awesome transmission in my opinion.  The ability to put it in any gear you like and keep it there has already come in very handy.  Also, if you have the cruise control set and go down a steep hill, the computer will downshift automatically for more engine braking so you never exceed the speed you have it set for  -  I love that feature.  I've never driven a better combination of small engine/transmission than the 2.5 mated with the 6F35.   I'm 100% happy with it.  I've driven several cars with small 4 cylinder engines mated to 4 speed transmissions and always found them lacking  -  You just need more gear ratios to get the best from small engines, even in small cars  -  Buying a 2.0 four mated to a 4 speed automatic in a 3500 lb van (maybe pulling a trailer, which we frequently do) would have left me kicking myself for not doing more research

Don

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CVT is the best for small engines, IMHO. They're getting more and more common as well as the technology has matured.

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I would agree with you that the CVT is a good match for a small engine without lots of torque *if* it's in a small car that you won't use to tow anything.  It's an even more appealing idea if you regularly trade cars well before they see the 100K mark on the odometer, as even the latest, greatly improved versions have a history of failure before 100K miles. After the warranty expires, replacing it will be very costly  -  Many really good looking cars in the boneyard have failed CVT's and the replacement cost evidently wasn't worth it to the owner

I wouldn't want one in a heavier car, or with any engine which develops plenty of torque  -  You don't see them behind V8's and for good reason.  When they fail (not *if*) they usually cannot be rebuilt and replacing the trans typically runs between $3K and $5K USD.  I would not buy one in a TC if it was offered  -  Too heavy and towing 2,000 pounds with one would be an invitation to failure

Don

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15 minutes ago, Beta Don said:

When they fail (not *if*) they usually cannot be rebuilt and replacing the trans typically runs between $3K and $5K USD.

I once helped a guy compare the transmission configuration in my Toyota. His CVT belt blew due to lack of maintenance. He bought the car used and it had 280 000 km (175K mi) on the odo. He managed to source the original manufacturer of the transmission parts in China and got it running for a couple of hundred (did his own labor), including resurfacing the pulleys which got damaged by the belt chips. So it can be done and more so in the future when the novelty factor is gone.

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Posted (edited)

They have been around for along time .In lots of things , as the quality of the materials  gets  cheaper and cheaper. The use of Cvt transmissions will rise.

Edited by G B L

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