Jump to content

Welcome to the Ford Transit Connect Forum

Welcome to the Ford Transit Connect Forum - the largest Ford Transit forum discussion board.  Like most online communities, you must register to post and take advantage of other features that this community has to offer, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of Ford Transit Connect Forum by signing in or creating an account.
• Receive special product discounts
• Invitations to events
• Start new topics and reply to others
• Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
• Get your own profile page and make new friends
• Send personal messages to other members
• Create an album and post photos. . .More!

Click here to create an account now.

 

transit connect guest message logo.png


   
  •  
    Custom Search





tc777

fuse box access

Recommended Posts

Ok. , any tips on getting the fuse panel off without breaking it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

You mean cover plate? Brute force was the only thing that worked for me. It went back on amazingly easy though in comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hal    8

You mean cover plate? Brute force was the only thing that worked for me. It went back on amazingly easy though in comparison.

I assume you are talking about the cover over some fuses and the OBDII port on the lower left of the dash. I actually pulled some of the fasteners for the dash loose before I got the cover plate off. As noted it went back together easily.

I'll have to remember to take the cover off myself before I take it for emissions testing as I would trust the folks out there to get the cover off without tearing up half the dash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got my TC in early August, and just found this forum tonight.

So: Since the time y'all posted about the ODB / fuse box cover, has anyone found a way to get the cover off more easily and without risking damage to anything? For example is there is secret slot to stick a screwdriver blade into, or anything like that?

I'm going to install a ScanGauge in the next week or two, so I'm going to have to get that cover off one way or another, and probably file a round notch in the side of the cover to enable putting it back on with the cable in place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted by ncranchero - 23 August 2010

"Have you checked these out in comparison to the ScanGauge?

http://www.ultra-gau…gauge/index.htm"

First, thanks to both PBXgeek and ncranchero for mentioning something that I've wanted all along but didn't even know existed!

That is the ScanGauge and Ultra-Gauge instruments that plug into the ODBII port of the Transit Connect, and also a whole bunch of other vehicles.

I went with the Ultra-Gauge for three reasons. Cheaper, more compact, and more readouts. Cost was $70.00 plus shipping. There's also a $9.00 rebate, but from reading the Ultra-Gauge forum comments, they really make you jump through the hoops to get it. I may give it a try later. . .

(For the record, I'm not associated with either company, just a customer of the Ultra-Gauge folks.)

First the the good news. It's plug and play with what appears to be a minimum of set up. Initially it scanned the TC's computer and reported, I think 18 possible readouts. I say I think, because they do not provide a paper manual so I was busy trying not to drop my laptop while reading the instructions. Anyway, when I looked up, ta-dah!, it was asking how much fuel the tank held and what was the displacement of the engine.

Installation was a breeze, really. Once I got the fuse panel access door open. As stated in a prior post, there is no easy way to open it that I could see. It's pretty much brute force.

The cover is semi flexible and I managed to pry it open a crack at the top to see if I could peek inside an see a latch mechanism. No joy there.

It's secured by two "plug in" connectors that have to be pulled free of their receptacles. They fit really tight. It takes a good steady pull to free them.

A suggestion. Pull them free, one at a time. That is favor, for example the left side of the door, it hinges on the bottom, and pry the left side free, then do the same thing on the right. That's all there is too it.

As for routing the cable, I mounted the Ultra-Gauge on the left, near the A-pillar. There is an opening just under the dash that you can route the cable through and feed it down to the OBDII connector. Actually the connector pretty much 'fell' to the bottom of the dash area. I wrapped the extra cable using the wire tie provided and plugged it in.

That's it! The Ultra-Gauge was up and running. Note that there is a calibration step, but I haven't done that yet. I then took it for a ride to see how it performs.

The display, on a bright sunny day is easy to read, the characters easy to see.

The bad news. . .

The door cannot be replaced with the OBDII connector plugged in.

I'm considering cutting a window in the fuse access door to accommodate the OBDII plug. No rush on that for now.

Roland(boomer43)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re. NCRanchero re. UltraGauge: Thanks for bringing it up, but I stuck with ScanGauge because there's a larger body of accumulated information from users so far. Over time that will probably change as more people start using UltraGauge.

I managed to get the ODB door off surprisingly easily. Just a steady tug on the little finger-hole and the "plug-ins" at the top came out, and then the hooks at the bottom unhooked. Yes, the cover won't go back on with the ScanGauge plugged in, but I'm not going to worry about that. The cover goes in the glove box in case I have any reason to put it back on.

For now the cable is wrapped loosely around the steering column, where it fits nicely and almost invisibly, without interfering with anything. The ScanGauge is resting in the space at the bottom of the instrument panel, in front of the odometer reset buttons, and not tied down with velcro or anything, so I can reset my trip meter when I log my trips. This is probably the best place for it since it's not in the sun as it would be if mounted above the instrument panel.

Actual mpg:

First run, before I got used to the rapid feedback and adjusted my driving habits: city, 19 - 20.

Test run, after adjusting my driving: City, 25 - 27. Freeway at 50 mph: 37 - 38.

Having feedback and paying attention, almost immediately produces about a 25% efficiency improvement in city driving.

Translation: average savings of about $300 / year in gas costs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IF YOU LOOK AT THE OBDII CONNECTOR, IT IT HELD ON WITH TWO TORX SCREWS. TAKE THEM OUT AND CAREFULLY REMOVE THE OBDII CONNECTOR. IT HAS A 90 DEGREE BRACKET WITH ADDITIONAL HOLES. PULL THE PAL CLIPS OFF THE MOUNTING AND PUT THEM ON THE OBDII CONNNECTOR AND

REMOUNT THE OBDII FACING DOWN. YOU WILL BE ABLE TO PLUG IN YOUR WIRE AND BE ABLE TO PUT THE FUSE BOX COVER ON. ON THE SIDE OF THE DASH BY THE DOOR, THERE IS AN ADDITION ACCESS PANEL WHERE YOU CAN THREAD YOUR WIRE AND GET IT UP TO THE DASH OR GO UNDERNEATH THE DASH TO THE CENTER.

WOODY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Done!

Per JWWOODY's suggestion (see above posting) I reconfigured the OBDII mounting bracket and the door can now be closed. Nice and neat. The gauge sits on the top of the dash, far left side with only about six inches of cable showing.

I can post a picture or two if someone wants.

Roland(boomer43)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×